Topic: air pollution

Landmark air pollution study turns 20

January 7, 2014 — Last month marked the 20th anniversary of the publication of Harvard School of Public Health’s groundbreaking Six Cities study, which—by revealing a strong link between air pollution and mortality risk—paved the way for strengthened U.S. regulations on fine particulate matter.…

HSPH's Connolly fighting tobacco use worldwide

Gregory N. Connolly, director of the Center for Global Tobacco Control and professor of the practice of public health at HSPH, was featured in the Harvard Gazette for his research into the health effects of tobacco and the effectiveness of interventions designed…

Emissions from traffic congestion may shorten lives

Air pollution from traffic congestion in 83 of the nation’s largest urban areas contributes to more than 2,200 premature deaths annually, costing the health system at least $18 billion, according to a study by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers featured…

Ecosystem alteration linked to human health risks

November 25, 2013 — Across the globe, there are signs that human activity is causing changes to Earth’s natural systems that may result in risks to health—from Indonesia, where fires used to clear land have been linked to cardiopulmonary disease downwind in…

Energy-efficient buildings can be hazardous to health

Buildings that are being weatherized and made energy-efficient and air tight can be hazardous to one’s health, according to a new Institute of Medicine (IOM) report. The report, “Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health,” prepared by a committee chaired by Harvard…

Messages of Silent Spring still relevant 50 years later

The environmental lessons of Rachel Carson’s book Silent Spring have applications today, 50 years after publication of the seminal book. Despite the book’s impact over five decades, some of its lessons appear to need reteaching, according to John Spengler, the Akira Yamaguchi…

Sleep apnea among health problems hitting the poor hardest

The poor are disproportionately afflicted with a wide range of health problems, including heart disease, type 2 diabetes, asthma, infant mortality, and dental disease. Sleep deficiency and disorders including sleep apnea also are particularly common among minority groups and those from economically…

Stress may add to pollution risks for low-income children

Children living in low-income neighborhoods, often exposed to unsafe levels of pollution, may also face additional risk from the stress of growing up in poverty, according to a new body of research. Such children may actually be more biologically susceptible to contaminants…

Aging light fixtures in New York City schools leaking PCBs

Inspections have revealed that elevated levels of polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, are leaking from aging light fixtures in many New York City public schools. HSPH’s Robert Herrick, senior lecturer on industrial hygiene, spoke to the Wall Street Journal about PCBs and their…