Topic: chronic disease

Report compares dietary fat intake among countries

April 17, 2014—Harvard School of Public Health researchers and colleagues have compiled the first global data on dietary intakes of specific fats worldwide. The report compares the intake of saturated fat, cholesterol, trans fats, omega 3s, and other fats and oils among…

Deadly environments

[Fall 2013 Centennial issue] On a October afternoon in 1948, daylight barely trickled into the storefronts of Donora, Pennsylvania. Stagnant weather had trapped a noxious black cloud of emissions from nearby steel and zinc plants above the town, nestled in a valley…

Fats: Controversy and Consensus

Fats have been in the news recently following a paper published in the Annals of Internal Medicine questioning recommendations on limiting saturated fat intake, which was covered by many media outlets, including by New York Times columnist Mark Bittman in a column…

‘Binge-watching’ TV may be harmful to health

Settling into a comfortable chair to “binge-watch” multiple episodes of your favorite TV show for hours may be hazardous to your health over the long-term, according to Lilian Cheung, lecturer and director, health promotion and communication for the Department of Nutrition at…

Spring 2013 Frontlines

[ Spring 2013 ] Quick updates about the latest public health news from across the School and beyond. HSPH cracks secrets of the malaria parasite HSPH researchers, led by Manoj Duraisingh, HSPH associate professor of immunology and infectious diseases, have discovered the…

Bacteria without borders

[ Winter 2008 ] Scientists trace inflammatory ulcerative colitis to failure of immune system “peacekeeper” A delicate barrier is all that stands between billions of foreign bacteria living in the large intestine, or colon, and the misery of ulcerative colitis. This chronic, poorly understood…

Why do we age? Surprising revelations from a worm

[ Fall 2012 ] HSPH’s Will Mair hopes his work in worms will identify molecules that have an effect on aging-related diseases—and which could ultimately be tested as treatments for humans. “How old you are is immutable—you can’t change how old an…

Inflammatory bowel disease: Trouble at the border

In the healthy colon, or bowel, of both mice and humans, a thin lining protects the intestinal wall from bacteria. There, immune system dendritic cells in the wall sample bacteria that live within the bowel, vigilant against unwelcome invaders. Within these cells,…

HPV screening: Saving lives in resource-poor nations

[Fall 2013 Centennial issue] Each year, approximately half a million women develop cervical cancer, a malignancy linked to high-risk strains of the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV). In wealthy nations, cervical cancer deaths have plummeted over the six decades that the Pap…