Topic: environmental health

COPD heightens deadly lung cancer risk in smokers

For immediate release: September 25, 2015 Boston, MA ─ Smokers who have chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) may face nearly twice the risk of getting small cell lung cancer (SCLC)—the deadliest form of lung cancer—than smokers who don’t have COPD, according to…

A call to action on food systems and climate change

September 30, 2015 — Researchers and policy makers must take steps to address air pollution, climate change, and other environmental issues related to crop and livestock production that, left unchanged, could one day severely impact the world’s food supply and human health,…

Exploring the health value of global fisheries

A new project based at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health aims to quantify the human health value of fisheries around the world, to determine the health risks of fishery decline and collapse, and to develop tools to better manage these…

A new agenda for the planet’s health  

September 25, 2015 — On September 25 the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Sustainable Development Goals, a new global agenda to replace the Millennium Development Goals. The 17 new goals include 169 targets to be met over the next 15 years in…

Air pollution killing 3.3 million people a year worldwide

Air pollution causes 3.3 million deaths worldwide each year—primarily from strokes and heart attacks—according to a new study by a Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health researcher and colleagues. The study used health statistics and computer modeling to generate the most…

Exposure to pesticides in childhood linked to cancer

Young children who are exposed to insecticides inside their homes may be slightly more at risk for developing leukemia or lymphoma during childhood, according to a meta-analysis by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health researchers. The article was published online September…

Building safer construction sites

[Fall 2015] Emily Sparer may be the first Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health student to have construction workers cheering her on at her dissertation defense. Sparer, who graduated in May with an SD in occupational safety and ergonomics, developed a…

Hydroelectric energy could increase harmful pollutant in Arctic

Concentrations of methylmercury — a neurotoxicant that can accumulate in fish — have been rising in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions due to melting sea ice. A new study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health researchers suggests that hydroelectric development…

Renewable energy projects can improve health

Renewable electricity projects and energy efficiency measures could have health benefits worth millions of dollars a year, according to a new study published August 31, 2015 in Nature Climate Change. Researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health developed an assessment…

Breastfeeding may expose infants to toxic chemicals

For immediate release: August 20, 2015 Boston, MA ─ A widely used class of industrial chemicals linked with cancer and interference with immune function—perfluorinated alkylate substances, or PFASs—appears to build up in infants by 20%–30% for each month they’re breastfed, according to…