Topic: environmental health

Use of common pesticide linked to bee colony collapse

For immediate release: Thursday, April 5, 2012 Boston, MA – The likely culprit in sharp worldwide declines in honeybee colonies since 2006 is imidacloprid, one of the most widely used pesticides, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health…

A burning passion

[ Winter 2014 ] When Catlin Powers first stepped into a nomadic family’s canvas tent in the Chinese Himalayas, she was overpowered by the smell of burning yak dung, the traditional source of fuel. She almost choked on the thick yellow smoke that spewed…

Our world our challenge

March 2009 -- Explore HSPH's contribution to environmental health science -- from protecting workers from toxic exposures to investigating the subtler health impacts of air pollution -- through interviews and footage of faculty and students in the Department of Environmental Health. Segments…

Why Public Health? Peter James

April 2011 -- In our new series "Why Public Health?" we ask Harvard School of Public Health students to talk about why they chose to enter the field. Above, Peter James, a doctoral student of Environmental Health and Epidemiology, hopes to use his research to…

Pesticides tied to ADHD in children

July 2010 -- Marc Weisskopf, Mark and Catherine Winkler Assistant Professor of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology, discusses a study that finds children exposed to higher levels of pesticides known as organophosphates could have a higher risk of being diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity…

Aircraft noise linked with heart problems

For immediate release: Tuesday, October 8, 2013 Boston, MA — Older people exposed to aircraft noise, especially at high levels, may face increased risk of being hospitalized for cardiovascular disease, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH)…

Lead in the environment: No safe dose

September 2010 -- Philippe Grandjean, adjunct professor of environmental health, discusses the findings of a report by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), which concludes there is no known safe exposure to lead. (3:07) Abstract of Grandjean's commentary in The Lancet (Sept. 11, 2010)

The dance of the cells: A minuet or a mosh?

For immediate release: May 22, 2011 Boston, MA – The physical forces that guide how cells migrate—how they manage to get from place to place in a coordinated fashion inside the living body— are poorly understood. Scientists at the Harvard School of…

Mercury on the rise in endangered Pacific seabirds

For immediate release: April 18, 2011 Boston, MA – Using 120 years of feathers from natural history museums in the United States, Harvard University researchers have been able to track increases in the neurotoxin methylmercury in the black-footed albatross (Phoebastria nigripes), an…