Topic: epidemiology

Eat more beans, less white rice, to reduce diabetes risk

A new study by HSPH researchers Josiemer Mattei, Frank Hu, and Hannia Campos has found that beans are the far healthier half of the classic beans and rice dish. The researchers studied the diets of nearly 1,900 Costa Rican men and women…

Nutrition news: Mediterraneans abandon their famous diet

Italians, Greeks, and Spaniards are getting heavier, in spite of the fact that their countries are home to the Mediterranean diet, a diet rich in vegetables, legumes, fruits, nuts and healthy fats. Young people in particular are moving toward an “industrial” diet…

Infectious disease: lessons learned from H1N1 pandemic

June 14, 2010 -- For the next new infectious threat—or the next phase of the ongoing H1N1 influenza pandemic—public health decision makers need better data about who’s infected and who’s severely sick. And they need it sooner, said experts who met at…

Sleep apnea among health problems hitting the poor hardest

The poor are disproportionately afflicted with a wide range of health problems, including heart disease, type 2 diabetes, asthma, infant mortality, and dental disease. Sleep deficiency and disorders including sleep apnea also are particularly common among minority groups and those from economically…

Eating white rice regularly may raise type 2 diabetes risk

Eating white rice on a regular basis may increase the risk for type 2 diabetes, according to new Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) research. HSPH researchers from the Department of Nutrition—led by Emily Hu, research assistant, and Qi Sun, research associate—reviewed…

New HSPH online edX course will reach worldwide audience

October 3, 2012 -- Quantitative Methods Course Teaches Building Blocks of Public Health Research It’s time for biostatistics and epidemiology class. The professor is discussing Scotsman James Lind, who, in the mid-1700s, conducted one of the first-ever clinical experiments. Lind studied the way…

International symposium in Boston targets drug resistance

October 11, 2011 -- Scientists from around the globe gathered in Boston this month to discuss the enduring problem of diseases like tuberculosis, gonorrhea, malaria, HIV/AIDS, and other infectious diseases that have been treated for decades but are becoming increasingly drug-resistant. The…

Monkey malaria parasite poses increasing risks to humans

May 9, 2013 -- A new study has shed light on why a monkey malaria parasite that typically caused only mild infection in humans is now beginning to cause severe disease and death—and how it has the potential to become a dangerous…

SNAP program fails to boost consumption of healthy foods

November 25, 2013 — The federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) has failed to boost the nutritional value of food purchased and consumed by recipients or to improve food security (ensuring participants have food to meet household needs), according to a new…