Topic: epidemiology

Rotavirus vaccine is safe, study finds

More than 500,000 babies around the world die each year from severe diarrhea and dehydration caused by rotavirus. A widely used vaccine for the pathogen was pulled from the market in 1999 out of concerns that it raised a baby’s risk of…

Blood type linked to heart disease risk

Heart disease risk may be linked to blood type, according to new Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) research. Senior author Lu Qi, assistant professor in the Department of Nutrition, and colleagues found that people with blood types A, B, or AB…

Solvent exposure and cognitive function

Exposure to solvents on the job may reduce cognitive skills later in life for those with less than a high school education, Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers and their French colleagues report in a new study. Cognitive skills of more…

Does mammography screening save lives?

September 13, 2012 -- Over the past 40 years, many have come to view mammography screening as the “gold standard” for early breast cancer detection. But a number of recent studies have cast doubt on its benefits. Some suggest that decreased breast…

Bird flu research needs broader discussion

HSPH infectious disease expert Marc Lipsitch is concerned that the public has shown little interest in the debate over the potential risks and benefits of conducting bird flu research. There needs to be a much broader conversation that goes beyond the scientific…

Use anti-smoking tactics to combat obesity

While overall cancer death rates in the United States have decreased over the past two decades, increasing numbers of people are suffering from obesity-related cancers such as esophageal, pancreatic, liver, and kidney cancers, according to the American Cancer Society’s annual report. To…

Buckee named an ‘Innovator Under 35’

August 21, 2013 — Caroline Buckee, assistant professor of epidemiology and associate director of the Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics at Harvard School of Public Health, has been named by MIT Technology Review as one of this year’s Innovators Under 35. The honor…

Minimizing the risk of infections at the gym

Staph, funguses, wart viruses, cold and flu bugs—all are lurking at the gym, according to William Hanage, HSPH associate professor of epidemiology. So it’s important to take precautions. Quoted in the Boston Globe Oct. 5, 2011, Hanage offered a number of suggestions…

Gestational diabetes: The diagnosis debate

August 9, 2013 — Gestational diabetes—diabetes that women develop while pregnant—can lead to serious health problems for both babies and mothers. Babies can be born too large or have birth injuries. Mothers can face greater risk of needing a cesarean delivery. For…