Topic: epidemiology

Heart disease: A little exercise goes a long way

Even a small amount of exercise may significantly lower your risk of getting heart disease, according to a new study conducted at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). A team led by Jacob Sattelmair, who did the research while a doctoral…

Selenium-rich diet may lower type 2 diabetes risk

People with high levels of selenium in their bodies were found to have as much as a 24% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those with the lowest levels of the mineral, according to a new study from Harvard School…

La Niña weather patterns linked to flu pandemics

A new study co-authored by HSPH’s Marc Lipsitch links the four most recent influenza pandemics (1918, 1957, 1968, and 2009) to the weather pattern known as La Niña. During these periods, the surface temperature in the equatorial Pacific cools and can alter…

Nutrition news: The good and bad of carbohydrates

Walter Willett, Fredrick John Stare professor of epidemiology and nutrition and chair, Department of Nutrition at HSPH, and Frank Hu, professor of nutrition and epidemiology, are among nutrition experts interviewed by the Los Angeles Times on Dec. 20, 2010, on how to…

Nutrition news: Hold the salt, pass the potassium

Too much salt paired with too little potassium may increase people’s risk of mortality, according to a study co-authored by Harvard School of Public Health professor of nutrition and epidemiology Frank Hu. Hu and colleagues found that people with a diet high…

The staggering toll of noncommunicable diseases

October 29, 2013 — Chronic diseases including heart disease, diabetes, and cancer, are the leading cause of death worldwide, with the burden falling heaviest in low- and middle-income countries. A new article by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers outlines the…

Study finds early treatment may delay onset of AIDS

New findings suggest that HIV-infected patients may delay the onset of AIDS by starting drug therapy earlier while their immune systems are stronger. Researchers including Lauren Cain, a research fellow at HSPH, recommend that patients start treatment earlier than current US guidelines…