Topic: global health

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Statistics paint a changing picture

Women Breast, cervical, stomach, lung, and colorectal cancers are the most common cancers among women in developing nations. Breast cancer now surpasses cervical cancer as the number one cause of cancer-related deaths in all but the poorest nations of the world. Developing…

Join the global fight against tobacco

To reduce health disparities in a single act, the United States should join the global community in ratifying the first international public health treaty, the World Health Organization (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). Tobacco addiction, the leading cause of preventable…

Fighting sexual violence in the Congo

[Fall 2013 Centennial issue] The plight of women in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) has captured headlines, as women have fallen prey to lawlessness and violence in the ongoing conflict that first broke out in 1996. Since its inception,…

A women and health agenda: It's time

[ Spring/Summer 2010 ] by Julio Frenk, Dean, Harvard School of Public Health In today’s global health agenda, women’s experiences—from birth to death and in all their diversity—deserve to occupy center stage. Why? Because at the most basic level, we are talking about sheer survival.…

A simple solution that has saved millions

[Fall 2013 Centennial issue] A solution of table salt, sodium bicarbonate, glucose, and water. This simple elixir, known as oral rehydration solution (ORS), has saved tens of millions of people since the 1970s from death by cholera and other diarrheal diseases—now the second…

Cancer is on the rise in developing countries

[Fall 2009] by Julio Frenk, MD, MPH, PhD Dean, Harvard School of Public Health While it's well known that cancer is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide, what is less recognized and understood is the significant growth of cancer in the developing…

Poverty, disasters & health against all odds

[Fall 2013 Centennial issue] The most powerful influences on population health are not the medical interventions that diagnose and treat disease. Rather, they are the broad social forces—war or peace, poverty or financial security, political oppression or fundamental human rights—that shape all…

Making sense of sexual violence in Central Africa

[ Spring 2009 ] Imani* was just 15 when soldiers from the rebel group Interahamwe seized her on the road. Amid a bewildering array of competing armies, local militias, and rebel factions, sexual brutality has reached unprecedented levels there, terrorizing Congolese women…

HPV screening: Saving lives in resource-poor nations

[Fall 2013 Centennial issue] Each year, approximately half a million women develop cervical cancer, a malignancy linked to high-risk strains of the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV). In wealthy nations, cervical cancer deaths have plummeted over the six decades that the Pap…

Changing the cycle of family abuse in India and South Asia

[ Spring/Summer 2010 ] Child Brides, Child Mothers, Child Victims It’s a tale of two siblings that plays out hundreds of thousands of times every year in rural India. While her older brother completes his education and is given the opportunity to…