Topic: heart disease

Berries may lower women’s heart attack risk

A new study led by researchers from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and the University of East Anglia finds that women who eat three or more servings of blueberries and strawberries each week may lower their risk of having a heart attack.…

Does being overweight really reduce mortality?

Panelists challenge controversial findings In a recent paper in the Journal of the American Medical Association that combined the results of many studies of body mass index (BMI) and mortality, Katherine Flegal from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and co-authors…

Better diet after heart attack may reduce death risk

Healthy eating after a heart attack appears to significantly lower the risk of death, according to a new Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) study. Examining data from about 4,000 men and women, researchers found that people whose post-heart attack diets improved…

Harvard events highlight benefits of Mediterranean diet

Recent events at Harvard highlighted the benefits of the Mediterranean diet, capitalizing on growing interest after a recent study provided strong new evidence of the diet’s ability to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke. An event held Wednesday, April 3…

Women generally have same heart disease symptoms as men

Contrary to popular belief, women generally experience the same coronary artery disease (CAD, or cardiovascular disease) symptoms — including chest pain, pressure, and/or tightness — as men, [[Catherine Kreatsoulas]], research fellow in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at Harvard School…

Study finds Mediterranean diet reduces heart disease risk

Switching to a Mediterranean diet—rich in olive oil, nuts, beans, fish, fruits, vegetables, and wine in moderation—can help prevent about 30% of heart attacks, strokes, and deaths from heart disease in people at high risk compared with those eating a typical low-fat…

Growing ‘weight extremes’ among women in developing world

Obese and overweight women are gaining weight rapidly in low-and middle-income countries while those who are severely undernourished are not experiencing similar weight gains, according to a study by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and University of Toronto researchers. This growing…