Topic: nutrition

Altering perception of feeding state may promote healthy aging

For immediate release: February 26, 2015 Boston, MA — Targeting mechanisms in the central nervous system that sense energy generated by nutrients might yield the beneficial effects of low-calorie diets on healthy aging without the need to alter food intake, suggests new…

New Ph.D. program in Population Health Sciences announced

February 10, 2015 Dear Faculty, Academic Appointees, and Staff, I am pleased to announce that the Faculty of Arts and Sciences has unanimously approved a new Ph.D. program in Population Health Sciences, which will be based at the Harvard T.H. Chan School…

Bee decline could increase malnutrition and disease risk

More than half of people living in four of the world’s poorest countries could be newly at risk for malnutrition if bees and other pollinating animals continue to decline, according to a new study by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of…

New molecular target identified for treating cerebral malaria

For immediate release: January 30, 2015 Boston, MA – A drug already approved for treating other diseases may be useful as a treatment for cerebral malaria, according to researchers at Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health. They discovered a novel link between…

Staying Active

In addition to eating high-quality foods, physical activity can help you reach and maintain a healthy weight. Getting regular physical activity is one of the best things you can do for your health. It lowers the risk of heart disease, diabetes, stroke,…

A healthy breakfast essential to losing weight

If you want to lose weight or maintain a proper weight, eat a healthy breakfast, Eric Rimm, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, advised in the Boston Globe January 13, 2015. Breakfast should make up…

Breakfast and heart disease risk

July 2013 -- A new study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health researchers Leah Cahill and Eric Rimm finds that skipping breakfast led to a 27% increase in coronary heart disease risk among men. (Conversations on Public Health podcast series,…