Announcements & Opportunities

Francesca Dominici named 2022 Mosteller Statistician of the Year (Jan 2022)

The award is the highest honor given by the Boston Chapter of the American Statistical Association. It honors the legacy of Fred Mosteller, and is given to a distinguished statistician who has made both exceptional contributions to the field of statistics and outstanding service to the statistical community.
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Racial, ethnic minorities and low-income groups in U.S. exposed to higher levels of air pollution (Jan 2022)

Certain groups in the U.S.—Blacks, Asians, Hispanics, Latinos, and low-income populations—are being exposed to higher levels of dangerous fine particulate air pollution (PM2.5) than other groups, according to new research from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
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Center Members Featured in NIEHS 2021 Papers of the Year

Of 3,942 publications by NIEHS researchers and grantees in 2021, institute leaders selected 35 as Papers of the Year.
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Decreased vehicle emissions linked with significant drop in deaths attributable to air pollution (Dec 2021)

As emissions fell over a decade, the number of deaths attributable to air pollution dropped by thousands, yielding billions of dollars in societal benefits
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Center Co-Hosts EJ Boot Camp focused on environmental health disparities (Nov 2021)

Our Center, along with affiliated NIEHS centers at the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health and the University of California San Francisco, hosted a virtual two-day boot camp in August that gathered researchers from across the country to discuss the foundations of environmental justice research, uncover the roots of environmental health disparities, and highlight real-world solutions. This session was co-directed by Dr. Tamarra James-Todd.
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Understanding the Link between Air Pollution and Dementia (Oct 2021)

The Harvard Chan-NIEHS Center for Environmental Health is collaborating with Biogen to investigate the growing body of research that links air pollution and brain health. The Center is conducting a meta-analysis of the scientific literature that has proliferated significantly within the past two years.
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Tamarra James-Todd Promoted to Associate Professor, Environmental Reproductive Epidemiology (Sept 2021)

Tamarra James-Todd has been promoted to Mark and Catherine Winkler Associate Professor of Environmental Reproductive Epidemiology in the Department of Environmental Health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
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Joe Allen Pens Op-Ed in the Atlantic about Clean Air in Offices (Oct 2021)

“Americans spend 90 percent of our lives indoors. You take 6,000 breaths in your workplace on an average day.” In an op-ed for The Atlantic Magazine, Harvard Chan School’s Joseph Allen makes the case for clean air in offices.
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Jaime Hart

Jaime Hart receives 2021 ISEE Tony McMichael Mid-Career Award (Sept 2021)

This award recognizes a mid-term career scientist for their scientific contributions to the field of environmental epidemiology as well as their commitment to, and demonstration of, exceptional mentoring.
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Nancy Krieger appointed to UNESCO International Scientific Committee (June 2021)

Nancy Krieger, professor of social epidemiology, was appointed in June as a member of the UNESCO International Scientific Committee for the Slave Route Project: Resistance, Liberty, Heritage, in recognition of her work on the consequences of racism and discrimination. She also was recognized by the American Journal of Epidemiology, which named her article “Cancer Stage at Diagnosis, Historical Redlining, and Current Neighborhood Characteristics: Breast, Cervical, Lung, and Colorectal Cancers, Massachusetts, 2001–2015” one of the 10 best of 2020.
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The Nexus of Climate and Health: Marc Weisskopf Presents on Air Pollution and the Brain (Feb 2021)

Center Director Marc Weisskopf delivered his presentation during a webinar (Feb 23-24, 2021) hosted by the Center for Global Health Delivery, the Belfer Center’s Middle East Initiative at Harvard Kennedy School, and Harvard Global Health Institute. A panel of engineers and epidemiologists invested in planetary health, which focuses on the constitutive nature of human health and the environmental systems on which humans depend, discussed the production of fine airborne particles and pollution, and the epidemiological and health effects that these exposures may produce.

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Peter James Discusses the Role Nature Plays in Improving Our Mental and Physical Health on NPR (Sept 2021)

Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental Health Peter James speaks with Martha Bebinger, NPR Weekend Edition Saturday, about how trees could be a mental, physical, and climate change antidote.
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Mary Rice Speaks on Climate and Health Alongside Secretary John Kerry for Harvard Grand Rounds (Sept 2021)

The Harvard Medical Grand Rounds, held Sept. 8, 2021, focused on: “Fossil Fuel Pollution and the Climate Crisis: Patients, Practice, and Policy.” HMD Assistant Professor of Medicine and Center Member Mary Rice, MD, MPH, was one of the speakers, alongside Secretary John Kerry, United States Special Presidential Envoy for Climate.
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Meet Our Members: Chris Golden (Sept 2021)

We’d like you to meet Assistant Professor of Nutritional and Planetary Health Chris Golden, MPH, PhD. Below, we ask Chris about his research working with populations in Madagascar and the South Pacific, how he got started in this field, and what he does when he’s not at work.
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Chemicals in hair products, making rent as a grad student, and more: A conversation with Dr. Tamarra James-Todd (April 2021)

Our Center’s Organic Chemicals Research Core Director Tamarra James-Todd, Mark and Catherine Winkler Assistant Professor of Environmental Reproductive and Perinatal Epidemiology at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, discussed her background and research in an April 1, 2021, Q&A on the Environmental Health Defense Fund Health blog.
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Harvard Chan School study shows negative impacts of burning natural gas and biomass have surpassed coal generation in many states (May 2021)

New inventory of air pollution impacts from stationary sources over past decade shows trend may continue

A new study finds that burning natural gas, biomass, and wood now have more negative health impacts than burning coal in many states, and is a trend that may continue. The study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health published in Environmental Research Letters is the first to provide an inventory of the health impacts of each type of fuel burned at stationary sources from 2008-2017, based on available data.

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Center’s Mid-Career Principal Investigator Jin-Ah Park helps investigate cellular host factors required for SARS-CoV-2 infection (Nov 2020)

The paper, titled “In well-differentiated primary human bronchial epithelial cells, TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 induce expression of furin,” was recently published by the American Journal of Physiology-Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology.
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Center Member Nancy Krieger Leads Geocoding COVID-19 and Inequities Analyses (2020)

Center Member Nancy Krieger and colleagues are utilizing their Public Health Disparities Geocoding Project to “document inequities in the population distribution of COVID-19.” They make methods, data, & code freely available for analyses.
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Vaping-Induced Acute Lung Injury (Mar 2020)

Read David Christiani’s editorial (+audio interview) in The New England Journal of Medicine on the epidemic of vaping by young people and related severe lung injuries.
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Professional Sports and Health (July 2019)

Center Director Marc Weisskopf led a new research comparing the health of athletes in the National Football League and Major League Baseball. The study looked at 6,000 athletes between the years of 1979 and 2013. During that period, there were 517 deaths among NFL players and 431 deaths among MLB players, translating into a 26% higher mortality rate among football players compared with baseball players. The findings showed that while NFL players died of neurodegenerative diseases at a higher rate than MLB players, both groups of athletes were more likely to die of cardiovascular disease than brain diseases.
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Study finds hair-straightening products contain potentially harmful chemicals

Many of the hair relaxing and straightening products primarily used by black women and children contain hormone-disrupting chemicals associated with early puberty, preterm birth, and reproductive diseases, according to a recent study published in Environmental ResearchTamarra James-Todd, Mark and Catherine Winkler Assistant Professor of Environmental Reproductive and Perinatal Epidemiology at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, who previously studied the potential health risks of chemicals in hair products, shared product information with the researchers.
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Major Harvard Chan studies concur: Air pollution boosts U.S. death rates

Twenty-five years ago, the Harvard Six Cities Study drew a strong link between exposure to fine particulate air pollution and increased risk of early death in six U.S. cities. Last year, another Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health study using new technologies and innovations in statistical analysis drew the same main conclusion.
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