Course Enrollment Policies

Auditing Policy

Only Harvard Chan degree students, students cross-registering from Harvard faculties and approved institutions, and Harvard Chan-affiliated and approved postdoctoral fellows may audit school courses. Students wishing to audit courses may do so only with the permission of the instructor. All students auditing courses must register for the course through the Registrar with the grade option of “audit” indicated. Courses which exclude auditors are noted as such on the Course Descriptions. There is a limit of 5 credits per semester of audited course work while registered as a full- or part-time student fulfilling degree requirements. Students may not extend their time to degree in order to audit courses. If a student still has time to degree (graduation date) and is not registered for courses for credit, he/she may register for up to 5 credits of audited courses. Audited courses appear on transcripts. Summer courses may not be taken for audit.

If a student does not meet the minimum requirements for participating in a course as an auditor, the instructor may submit a grade of “WDA – Withdrawn from Audited Course.”

Pass/Fail Policy

New MPH-45 students starting in summer or fall 2017 will be limited to a maximum of 12.5 credits that may be taken as pass/fail out of the required 45 credits. New MPH-65 students starting in fall 2017 and January 2018 will be limited to a maximum of 17.5 credits that may be taken as pass/fail out of the required 65 credits

Online Course Enrollment Policy

Academic year (residential) and summer-only MPH students may enroll in online courses on a space-available basis. Academic year (residential) students are limited to a maximum of 3.75 online credits in any semester and no more than 10 online credits overall out of the required 45 credits for the MPH degree. Summer-only students are limited to a maximum of 5 online credits in any semester and no more than 10 online credits overall out of the required 45 credits for the MPH degree.

International students on an F1 visa should be aware that this visa regulation functions under the assumption that students are on campus and physically present in courses. Presence in the US is based on the notion that international students are in residence and taking classes in the US. The Harvard International Office serves as an ongoing resources regarding all immigration and visa regulation policies.