Causal frames and contextualized values may effectively produce support for new obesity policies

Former RWJF Health & Society Scholar Selena Ortiz has published a paper in Social Science and Medicine titled “Increasing public support for food-industry related, obesity prevention policies: The role of a taste-engineering frame and contextualized values.” The Taste-Engineering Frame (TEF) highlights the techniques used by the food industry to increase the availability and over-consumption of processed foods and sugary … Continue reading “Causal frames and contextualized values may effectively produce support for new obesity policies”

Supporting employees’ work-family needs improves health care quality

Thank you again to Cassandra Okechukwu for giving a seminar this past Thursday. Dr. Okechukwu has a new paper out in Social Science and Medicine titled “Supporting employees’ work-family needs improves health care quality: longitudinal evidence from long-term care.”  The study found that although managers of long-term care facilities perceived providing their employees with work-family … Continue reading “Supporting employees’ work-family needs improves health care quality”

Hawkins and Gillman link 3 decades of clinical and public health data to examine disparities in childhood obesity

Former RWJF Health & Society Scholar Summer Hawkins and faculty member Matthew Gillman are co-authors on a BMC Medicine article on the establishment of the Linked CENTURY database. Hawkins, Gillman and their colleagues linked the existing CENTURY ((Collecting Electronic Nutrition Trajectory Data Using Records of Youth) Study, a database of 269,959 children from birth to … Continue reading “Hawkins and Gillman link 3 decades of clinical and public health data to examine disparities in childhood obesity”

Borjas study on undocumented immigrants and labor featured in Wall Street Journal

 “The Labor Supply of Undocumented Immigrants,”  a new study by George Borjas, revealed three key insights: Undocumented immigrant men are far more likely to work than other groups, while undocumented immigrant women are far less likely to work. The employment gap that distinguishes undocumented men from the other groups widened dramatically over the past twenty … Continue reading “Borjas study on undocumented immigrants and labor featured in Wall Street Journal”

Using cash transfers to reduce HIV risk in young South African women

Bell Fellows Molly Rosenberg and Xavier Gomez-Olives have contributed to a paper looking at a phase III, individually randomized trial to assess the effect of a conditional cash transfer on HIV acquisition among South African young women. The study has found that interventions like cash transfers that address structural factors such as schooling and poverty … Continue reading “Using cash transfers to reduce HIV risk in young South African women”

Killewald on “tethered autonomy”

A new paper by Alexandra Killewald uses the term “tethered autonomy” to describe post-parenthood changes in partners’ housework hours, paid work hours, occupation traits, and wages. Killewald found that variation across American couples in work responses to parenthood is shaped primarily by variation in wives’ adjustments, while husbands’ work acts largely as a fixed point. … Continue reading “Killewald on “tethered autonomy””

Birth weight is a larger contributor to height than the socio-economic conditions in which a child grows up

Former Pop Center student Aditi Krishna is lead author on a new study in Economics & Human Biology that examines the role of birth weight in childrens’ height; Lisa Berkman, Gunther Fink, and SV Subramanian are co-authors. The study shows that prenatal conditions, reflected in birth weight, are more important in setting height trajectories in comparison to postnatal factors, which … Continue reading “Birth weight is a larger contributor to height than the socio-economic conditions in which a child grows up”

Lippert on the association between neighborhood crime and BMI/activity levels

RWJF alumnus Adam Lippert has recently published an article titled “Neighborhood Crime Rate, Weight-Related Behaviors, and Obesity: A Systematic Review of the Literature” in Sociology Compass.  The piece, which is a review of current literature, identifies the effects of neighborhood-level crime on obesity and physical activity outside of socioeconomic correlates. Findings from this review suggest … Continue reading “Lippert on the association between neighborhood crime and BMI/activity levels”

Estimating the Co-Development of Cognitive Decline and Physical Mobility Limitations in Older U.S. Adults

Former Harvard RWJF Health & Society scholar Steven Haas is an author on a new study published in Demography. The study examined the co-development of cognitive and physical function in older Americans using an age-heterogeneous sample drawn from the Health and Retirement Study (1998–2008). The study results indicated that favorable cognitive health and mobility at … Continue reading “Estimating the Co-Development of Cognitive Decline and Physical Mobility Limitations in Older U.S. Adults”