News and Announcements

Are those Americans living longer also living healthier?

It is commonly thought that those who live the longest typically experience a condensed period of illness (compression of morbidity) as opposed to many years of chronic illness. However, a recent study published in Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health by former Harvard Pop Center Bell Fellow Hiram Beltrán-Sánchez, PhD, and faculty member SV Subramanian, … Continue reading “Are those Americans living longer also living healthier?”

Novel study on impact of minimum wages on early-life health in LMICs

Harvard RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alum Arijit Nandi, PhD, is an author on a paper in Social Science & Medicine that is the first to assess the impact of legislated minimum wages on the early-life health of children in low- and middle-income countries.

How do we improve patient safety in the U.S. health care system?

Harvard Pop Center faculty member Asish Jha, MD, has co-authored a JAMA Viewpoint in which the authors reflect on improvements made over the last 15 years (since the landmark report To Err is Human) and suggest that with better data, valid metrics, greater transparency, and better systems in place, health care can become even safer … Continue reading “How do we improve patient safety in the U.S. health care system?”

Wildfire smoke consistently linked to respiratory health effects, growing evidence of link to mortality

Harvard RWJF Health & Society Scholar Colleen Reid, PhD, is lead author on a study in Environmental Health Perspectives that reviews a range of scientific studies on health effects from exposure to wildfire smoke, and seeks to identify particularly susceptible populations. Photo: Cameron Strandberg, Fitzhugh Newspaper. Jasper, Alberta

Exercise can delay nursing home admission for those at risk of dementia

Harvard Pop Center faculty member Maria Glymour, PhD, is an author on a paper published in Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics that explores whether modifiable risk factors. like smoking, exercise and alcohol consumption, can delay nursing home admission among those suffering from the cognitive impairment associated with initial stages of dementia. Photo: Dax Ward on … Continue reading “Exercise can delay nursing home admission for those at risk of dementia”

Impact of long-term unfair treatment on cardiovascular health in women found to vary by race

Rebecca C. Thurston, PhD, an alumna of the Harvard RWJF Health & Society Scholars program, is an author on a study published in Health Psychology that has found that Caucasian women who were exposed to cumulative (over a 10-year period) unfair treatment had worse cardiovascular health. The same exposures were not found to impact the … Continue reading “Impact of long-term unfair treatment on cardiovascular health in women found to vary by race”

Causal frames and contextualized values may effectively produce support for new obesity policies

Former RWJF Health & Society Scholar Selena Ortiz has published a paper in Social Science and Medicine titled “Increasing public support for food-industry related, obesity prevention policies: The role of a taste-engineering frame and contextualized values.” The Taste-Engineering Frame (TEF) highlights the techniques used by the food industry to increase the availability and over-consumption of processed foods and sugary … Continue reading “Causal frames and contextualized values may effectively produce support for new obesity policies”

Lower child mortality rates when longer paid maternity leave in LMICs

Harvard RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alum Arijit Nandi, PhD, is lead author on a study published in PLOS Medicine that finds a correlation between lower child mortality rates and longer paid maternity leave in low and middle income countries. The findings of the study have received attention on BigNewsNetwork.com.

Christina Roberto in NYT “Labeling the Danger in Soda”

Harvard RWJF Health & Society Scholar program alumna Christina Roberto, PhD, shares findings of her recently published study in Pediatrics on the influence and effectiveness of warning labels on sweetened beverages in this New York Times piece.

Supporting employees’ work-family needs improves health care quality

Thank you again to Cassandra Okechukwu for giving a seminar this past Thursday. Dr. Okechukwu has a new paper out in Social Science and Medicine titled “Supporting employees’ work-family needs improves health care quality: longitudinal evidence from long-term care.”  The study found that although managers of long-term care facilities perceived providing their employees with work-family … Continue reading “Supporting employees’ work-family needs improves health care quality”