How are changes in working status due to COVID-19 impacting the mental health of those Americans close to retirement age?

Harvard Pop Center’s Sloan Fellow on Aging and Work Leah Abrams, PhD, and recent Harvard Bell Fellow Lindsay Kobayashi, PhD, along with a colleague, have published their findings which reveal that workers who lost their jobs (more commonly associated with those who were under age 65 and those with less than a college degree), were … Continue reading “How are changes in working status due to COVID-19 impacting the mental health of those Americans close to retirement age?”

Combatting mental distress by shoring up resilience during COVID-19 pandemic

A study published in the Journal of Affective Disorders by our recent Bell Fellow Leslie Adams, PhD, and her colleagues takes a longitudinal look (with baseline and nine waves of follow-up data from March through August, 2020) at the relationship between resilience and mental distress in 6,008 participants in the Understanding America Study. “Adults living … Continue reading “Combatting mental distress by shoring up resilience during COVID-19 pandemic”

Why is the proportion of deaths from COVID-19 in nursing homes far less in Japan than in U.S.?

Ichiro Kawachi, MBChB, PhD, and his colleague Kazuhiro Abe, MD, PhD have written an op-ed in JAMA Health Forum that suggests that differences in standards of care and financing may be partially responsible for what appears to be differing infection rates between nursing homes in Japan and the U.S.

Finally, a look at COVID-19 mortality rates by race/ethnicity AND EDUCATIONAL LEVEL

“Intersectional inequities in COVID-19 mortality by race/ethnicity and education in the United States, January 1, 2020–January 31, 2021,” is the latest Harvard Pop Center working paper by Jarvis Chen, Christian Testa, Pamela Waterman, and Nancy Krieger. On February 2, the US National Center for Health Statistics published data relating to COVID-19 deaths that had been … Continue reading “Finally, a look at COVID-19 mortality rates by race/ethnicity AND EDUCATIONAL LEVEL”

Analyzing electronic health records can be a fast and accurate way to predict risk of death from COVID-19

Hossein Estiri, PhD, is lead author on a study that utilized artificial intelligence to leverage the data compiled in electronic health records to compute individual-level risk scores for death after a COVID-19 infection. Among those predictors at the top of the list for those between the ages of 45-65 were age, history of pneumonia, diabetes … Continue reading “Analyzing electronic health records can be a fast and accurate way to predict risk of death from COVID-19”

It’s “Groundhog Day,” AGAIN! Nearly one-half of COVID-19 vaccination data is missing race/ethnicity info., reminiscent of earlier gaps in COVID-19 case and mortality data

A Harvard Pop Center working paper points out that the Morbidity and Mortality report by the US Centers for Disease Control released on February 2 (which happened to be Groundhog Day) is missing race and ethnicity information for nearly half of the people who were vaccinated during the first month of the roll out. Age … Continue reading “It’s “Groundhog Day,” AGAIN! Nearly one-half of COVID-19 vaccination data is missing race/ethnicity info., reminiscent of earlier gaps in COVID-19 case and mortality data”

When it comes to risk factors for COVID-19 mortality, simulation study finds social determinants of health on par with diabetes

To compensate for there being little data available on the relationship between COVID-19 deaths and social determinants of health, Harvard Pop Center faculty members Ben Seligman and David Bloom, along with their colleague Maddalena Ferranna, have published a simulation study in PLOS Medicine that finds that individual-level social determinants of health (e.g., nonwhite race/ethnicity, income below … Continue reading “When it comes to risk factors for COVID-19 mortality, simulation study finds social determinants of health on par with diabetes”

Warning against basing equitable COVID-19 vaccine distribution on static county-level social & economic data

A Harvard Pop Center Working paper warns against basing equitable COVID-19 vaccine allocation throughout the U.S. on static county-level social and economic data, as researchers find “enormous” variation (time and region) in the relationship between community characteristics and COVID-19 case and death rates per capita over the last 9 months.