What is driving later-life cognitive function of a rural South African population that lived under Apartheid?

Harvard Bell Fellow Lindsay Kobayashi, PhD, is lead author on a paper published in Social Science & Medicine that is one of the few studies that takes a closer look at the life-course drivers (e.g., self-reported childhood health and father’s occupation) of cognitive aging in South Africa. Other authors include researchers associated with the Harvard … Continue reading “What is driving later-life cognitive function of a rural South African population that lived under Apartheid?”

Exercise may lower risk of types of breast cancer that are more difficult to treat

Harvard Bell Fellow Lindsay Kobayashi, PhD, is co-lead author on a study published in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment that has found that among post-menopausal women, moderate-to vigorous-physical activity (e.g., cycling, running, swimming) measured throughout the lifetime is linked to a reduced risk of the types of breast cancer (triple negative) that are not as … Continue reading “Exercise may lower risk of types of breast cancer that are more difficult to treat”

Kobayashi wins best poster by postdoc & research associate at Harvard Chan Poster Day

Congratulations to Harvard Bell Fellow Lindsay Kobayashi on winning Best Poster in the Best Postdoc and Research Associates category at this year’s Harvard Chan School Poster Day event. This poster was also presented at the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics meeting in July, 2017, and the abstract was published in Innovation in Aging.

How does perceived life expectancy influence colon cancer screening participation?

Harvard Bell Fellow Lindsay Kobayashi, PhD, is lead author on a study that has found those who expect to live another 10-15 years were significantly more likely to participate in colorectal cancer screening than those who expected to live five years or less. The results of the study also suggest that it may be important to communicate the risk … Continue reading “How does perceived life expectancy influence colon cancer screening participation?”