Long-term effects on sleep of older natural disaster victims

Ichiro Kawachi, MD, PhD, and Orfeu Buxton, PhD, are authors on a study that evaluated the sleep of those aged 65 and older who were impacted by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami. Two and a half years after the event, those who experienced material loss, such as financial and home, were still at greater risk of sleep problems. Photo: Tex Texin on Flickr

Two WFHN studies reinforce cyclical effect of getting enough, high quality sleep

Two studies by WFHN researchers help to illustrate the reciprocal relationship between sleep and the following day’s perceived stress levels, and vice versa, how daytime stressors can impact that night’s sleep. The studies are published in the Journal of Sleep Research and the Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

Better sleep for employees, especially older workers, with more workplace flexibility & supervisor support

A study (in press in Sleep Health) by the WFHN reveals that those employees (particularly older workers) of an IT company that took part in an intervention study evaluating the effects of increased workplace flexibility and supervisor support experienced better duration and quality of sleep, as measured with wrist actigraphy. Photo: Kelsey on Flickr

Better work-life balance can contribute to better sleep

Harvard Pop Center faculty member Orfeu Buxton was quoted in this Boston Globe article and in this article in Entrepreneur on the role that a healthy work-life balance can have on people’s sleep. Buxton, along with Pop Center Director Lisa Berkman and other Work, Family & Health Network researchers, recently published their findings in the journal Sleep Health.

Helpful algorithm for quantifying cardiometabolic risk may help motivate prevention and intervention

Harvard Pop Center Director Lisa Berkman and affiliated researcher Orfeu Buxton have co-authored a study that presents a way to quantify cardiometabolic risk using modifiable, non-self-reported risk factors which may help to motivate an individual’s commitment to prevention and intervention. The study has been published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Study shows increased cardiometabolic risk for female workers prone to work-related stress who don’t get adequate sleep or exercise

Harvard Pop Center affiliated faculty member Orfeu Buxton served as PI on a recently published paper in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine that investigated the effect of work-related stress, sleep deficiency, and physical activity on 10-year cardiometabolic risk among an all-female worker population.