Seafood is an ‘irrational’ economy

Barton Seaver, podcast, seafoodApril 2017. Boston, MA. Eating more seafood can be beneficial to human health, and the health of our environment. But increasing our production and consumption of seafood in a sustainable way poses challenges. In this week’s podcast, we share part one of our interview with chef and author Barton Seaver, director of the Sustainable Seafood and Health Initiative at the Center for Health and the Global Environment. Seaver explains why we need to change how we think about seafood—and the types of fish we’re willing to eat.

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The Future of Food: Feeding the Planet During Climate Change

December 2016. Boston, MA. By 2050, a projected 9.7 billion people will inhabit the planet. How will we produce enough nutritious food to support this burgeoning population and ensure access to food resources, particularly as climate change stresses the environment? This Forum explores innovative methods and systems for producing food, as well as new types of products and underutilized sources. The panelists talk about emerging technologies, including advances in genomics and aeroponics, to grow food. They also discuss ways to sustain at-risk food resources made vulnerable from climate change, and the impacts for populations in developing countries.

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Human health risks from hydroelectric projects

November 2016. Boston, MA. In a new study, Harvard University researchers find over 90 percent of potential new Canadian hydroelectric projects are likely to increase concentrations of the neurotoxin methylmercury in food webs near indigenous communities.

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Exposure to common flame retardant chemicals may increase thyroid problems in women

May 2016. Boston, MA. Women with elevated levels of common types of flame retardant chemicals in their blood may be at a higher risk for thyroid disease—and the risk may be significantly higher among post-menopausal women, according to a new study from researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

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Focus on the future of food

food, sustainabiltyFebruary 2017. Boston, MA. The concept behind the Weatherhead Center for International Affair’sGlobal Food+ 2017 summit was simple: expand knowledge and the discussion about the planet’s rapidly changing food supply chain. In 24, seven-minute speed-talks, scholars and researchers in the fields of health, food, and environmental science focused on the challenges of feeding the global population.

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The future of food discussed in a Facebook Live Q&A

December 2016. Boston, MA. How will climate change affect the food we eat? What does it mean to eat sustainably? How can consumers make environmentally friendly food choices? Those questions were discussed during a Facebook Live Q&A on Monday, December 12, with Gary Adamkiewicz, assistant professor of environmental and exposure disparities at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

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Can ‘green’ offices sharpen productivity?

August 2016. Boston, MA. People who work in “green” offices that are well-ventilated and have low levels of indoor pollutants and carbon dioxide may have significantly better cognitive function than people working in more traditional office environments, according to a recent study from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health’s Center for Health and the Global Environment (CHGE), SUNY Upstate Medical University, and Syracuse University.

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May 2016. Boston, MA. How often do you think about where your food comes from or how it was produced? According to Michael Pollan, author and fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, you should be asking those questions regularly. Pollan, who penned the 2006 bestseller The Omnivore’s Dilemma, joined Walter Willett, chair of the Department of Nutrition and Fredrick John Stare Professor of Epidemiology, for a Q&A at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

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Eating sustainably is healthier eating

 

May 2016. Boston, MA. How often do you think about where your food comes from or how it was produced? According to Michael Pollan, author and fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, you should be asking those questions regularly. Pollan, who penned the 2006 bestseller The Omnivore’s Dilemma, joined Walter Willett, chair of the Department of Nutrition and Fredrick John Stare Professor of Epidemiology, for a Q&A at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

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To advance sustainability, fight inequality, researcher says

sustainability, inequalityFebruary 2017. Boston, MA. Unless social and economic inequalities are addressed, sustainability efforts in urban centers will likely stall or never take hold, according to a new Harvard study. Authored by Robert Sampson, the study suggests that technological approaches must be accompanied by efforts to reduce those inequalities, create strong, long-lasting neighborhood social networks, and foster greater citizen interaction with government if sustainability projects are to be successful.

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Hunger for change: the need to fix the broken food system

November 2016. Boston, MA. Our food system, which makes healthy food expensive and junk food cheap, should be fixed, said a panel of experts who gathered at Harvard Law School on Nov. 30. The panel discussion — “Transforming Our Food System” — was sponsored by the Harvard Law School Food Law and Policy Clinic in partnership with the Union of Concerned Scientists.

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Helping businesses do good for people and the planet

June 2016. Boston, MA. Researchers with the Harvard T.H Chan School of Public Health initiative SHINE (Sustainability and Health Initiative for NetPositive Enterprise) encourage businesses to do more. The group works with companies to analyze their handprint—initiatives such as work-life balance policies and greener products that create a positive business impact—with a goal of having companies achieve a greater handprint than footprint, a position referred to as NetPositive.

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Green office environments linked with higher cognitive function scores

October 2015. Boston, MA. People who work in well-ventilated offices with below-average levels of indoor pollutants and carbon dioxide (CO2) have significantly higher cognitive functioning scores—in crucial areas such as responding to a crisis or developing strategy—than those who work in offices with typical levels, according to a new study from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health’s Center for Health and the Global Environment, SUNY Upstate Medical University, and Syracuse University.

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