Brendan D. Manning

Professor of Genetics and Complex Diseases

Director of the PhD Program in Biological Sciences in Public Health, Harvard University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

Department of Genetics and Complex Diseases

655 Huntington Avenue
SPH2-117
Boston, Massachusetts 02115
Phone: 617.432.5614

Other Affiliations

Director: Ph.D. Program in Biological Sciences in Public Health, Harvard University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

Member: Cancer Cell Biology Program, Dana Farber/Harvard Cancer Center

Member: Renal Cancer Program, Dana Farber/Harvard Cancer Center

Research

Cell signaling and metabolism in cancer, metabolic diseases, and aging.

Research in the Manning Lab is delineating how signals from nutrients and growth factors are propagated to coordinately regulate nutrient metabolism, with implications in a wide variety of complex human diseases. Research efforts are focused in part on defining the regulatory mechanisms and functions of the PI3K-mTOR signaling network.  This network senses and relays signals from nutrients and other growth cues to control key metabolic processes in cells and tissues. Importantly, frequent dysregulation of this network contributes to a diverse set of seemingly unrelated human diseases, including the majority of human cancers, genetic tumor syndromes (e.g, tuberous sclerosis complex, lymphangioleiomyomatosis, PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome), metabolic diseases (e.g., obesity, type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease), autoimmune and inflammatory diseases (e.g., arthritis, lupus, hepatitis), and neuroglogical disorders (e.g., epilepsy, autism, Alzheimers). This signaling network also influences the lifespan of organisms and serves as a major connection between diet and the aging process. The Manning lab seeks to unravel the complex molecular regulation of the PI3K-mTOR network under both physiological and pathological states, and how its downstream functions contribute to metabolic homeostasis and dysfunction.

Website Front Page Figure

Education

Ph.D., 2000, Yale University

BS, 1993, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Photo: Kent Dayton/Harvard Chan School