Topic: environmental health

Air Force reservists possibly exposed to Agent Orange from planes

Between 1,500 and 2,100 U.S. Air Force reservists who trained and worked on C-123 cargo planes that were used during the Vietnam War to spread the toxic defoliant Agent Orange may have been exposed to potentially dangerous levels of the carcinogenic chemical,…

Living green

[ Winter 2015 ] On a clear day, the air outside Anthony Cortese’s office in downtown Boston is filled with the unmistakable smell of the ocean—a pungent, brinelike perfume that hangs in the morning air. It floats in from the Inner Harbor,…

The heat is on: Causes of hospitalization due to heat waves identified

For immediate release: December 23, 2014 Boston, MA ─ In the largest and most comprehensive study of heat-related illness to date, Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers have identified a handful of potentially serious disorders—including fluid and electrolyte disorders, renal failure,…

Impact of fluoride on neurological development in children

July 25, 2012 -- For years health experts have been unable to agree on whether fluoride in the drinking water may be toxic to the developing human brain. Extremely high levels of fluoride are known to cause neurotoxicity in adults, and negative…

Fine particulate air pollution linked with increased autism risk

For immediate release: December 18, 2014 Boston, MA — Women exposed to high levels of fine particulate matter specifically during pregnancy—particularly during the third trimester—may face up to twice the risk of having a child with autism than mothers living in areas…

Police face higher risk of sudden cardiac death during stressful duties

For immediate release: November 18, 2014 Boston, MA — Police officers in the United States face roughly 30 to 70 times higher risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) when they’re involved in stressful situations—suspect restraints, altercations, or chases—than when they’re involved in…

A mother's crusade for clean water

[Fall 2013 Centennial issue] In 1972, Anne Anderson’s life changed forever. Her 3-year-old son Jimmy, the youngest of her three children, was diagnosed with leukemia—and other children who lived nearby were suffering from leukemia, too. “Everywhere I went—to the library, to the…

Harvard plans for ‘a more sustainable future’

Harvard launched a new five-year plan on October 22, 2014, aimed at improving the University’s environmental footprint, as well as the health and well-being of its students, faculty, and staff. The plan centers around five core topics: emissions and energy, campus operations,…

HSPH and Mexico: Ties that bind

This month, Harvard University President Drew Faust, Harvard School of Public Health Dean Julio Frenk, and other Harvard administrators and faculty traveled to Mexico to celebrate the university’s strong and longstanding relationship with that nation. Dean Frenk served as that country’s minister…

Power plant standards could save thousands of U.S. lives every year

New study from Harvard, Syracuse, and Boston University scientists links strong carbon standards to substantial reductions in air pollution and widespread health benefits For immediate release: Tuesday, September 30, 2014 Boston, MA -- Power plant standards to cut climate-changing carbon emissions will…