Topic: environmental health

Breastfeeding may expose infants to toxic chemicals

For immediate release: August 20, 2015 Boston, MA ─ A widely used class of industrial chemicals linked with cancer and interference with immune function—perfluorinated alkylate substances, or PFASs—appears to build up in infants by 20%–30% for each month they’re breastfed, according to…

Heat waves and cold snaps linked to death rate spikes

New England’s sudden temperature shifts may be causing spikes in deaths among the region’s seniors, according to new research from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study followed about 2.9 million people on Medicare for eight years, while at the…

New Ph.D. program in Population Health Sciences announced

February 10, 2015 Dear Faculty, Academic Appointees, and Staff, I am pleased to announce that the Faculty of Arts and Sciences has unanimously approved a new Ph.D. program in Population Health Sciences, which will be based at the Harvard T.H. Chan School…

Sudden weather shifts linked with more deaths

Lots of heat waves and cold snaps can increase mortality rates, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Previous studies have shown that more people die when it gets very hot or very cold. But those…

Environmental chemicals may harm fertility

Chemicals such as phthalates, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and biphenyl A (BPA)—endocrine disruptors that can mimic the body’s natural hormones—could be contributing to fertility problems. Although it’s likely that such chemicals are involved in infertility, it’s notoriously hard to tease out the root…

Taking the temperature of climate change

June 23, 2015 -- Antonella Zanobetti, principal research scientist in the Department of Environmental Health, discusses a new study that found that people appear to adapt over time as temperatures creep higher, but also may face increased mortality risk from extreme temperature swings—and…