Topic: environmental health

Air pollution may trigger anxiety symptoms

Recent exposure to air pollution raises the risk for anxiety symptoms, according to a new study by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and colleagues. The study of 71,271 women participating in the long-running Nurses’ Health Study found that higher…

Food microbes beware: It’s raining nanobombs

March 18, 2015 -- Can super-tiny droplets of water sprayed at strawberries, spinach, and lettuce kill deadly food pathogens? Philip Demokritou, associate professor of aerosol physics and director of the Laboratory for Environmental Health NanoSciences at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public…

A call for reducing fluoride levels in drinking water

March 10, 2015 — Controversy over fluoride levels in drinking water in Massachusetts has made headlines in recent months as Cambridge, Gloucester, Newburyport, and other towns in Massachusetts relook at the decades-old practice of adding fluoride to public drinking water to reduce…

Cost of hormone-disrupting chemical exposure in Europe in billions

March 10, 2015 — Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC) is estimated to cost the European Union more than €150 billion ($209 billion) a year in health care expenses and lost earning potential, according to studies by a team of 18 international researchers,…

Improving the food system

Food-related research was on the plate at a Harvard-wide symposium in late February. The Harvard Food+ Research Symposium, hosted by the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, the Harvard Kennedy School Sustainable Science Program, and the Harvard Center for the Environment, featured 22…

Cleaner air, better lungs

Reducing air pollution was associated with increased lung function in children ages 11 to 15, according to a new study in the New England Journal of Medicine. The new findings suggest that it’s important to continue efforts to improve air quality, say…

‘DNA clock’ can help predict lifespan

Scientists have found a biological clock that can provide clues about how long a person might live. The researchers found that people whose biological age was greater than their true age were more likely to die sooner than those whose biological and…

Cystic fibrosis and arsenic poisoning linked to same damaged protein

A new Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health co-authored study provides further evidence linking both arsenic poisoning and the chronic respiratory disease cystic fibrosis (CF) to damage in the CFTR protein. An examination of arsenic-exposed patients in Bangladesh found that they…

New Ph.D. program in Population Health Sciences announced

February 10, 2015 Dear Faculty, Academic Appointees, and Staff, I am pleased to announce that the Faculty of Arts and Sciences has unanimously approved a new Ph.D. program in Population Health Sciences, which will be based at the Harvard T.H. Chan School…

Bee decline could increase malnutrition and disease risk

More than half of people living in four of the world’s poorest countries could be newly at risk for malnutrition if bees and other pollinating animals continue to decline, according to a new study by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of…