Topic: epidemiology

Fats: Controversy and Consensus

Fats have been in the news recently following a paper published in the Annals of Internal Medicine questioning recommendations on limiting saturated fat intake, which was covered by many media outlets, including by New York Times columnist Mark Bittman in a column…

Global child TB infection estimates doubled

Approximately one million children contract tuberculosis (TB) annually, with 32,000 suffering from a multi-drug resistant (MDR) strain, according to a new study by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers and colleagues. These findings are double previous childhood TB estimates. The study,…

MRSA spreads to the barnyard

From farm animals to family pets, the deadly bacteria may lurk where you least expect it March 20, 2014—If you think the drug-resistant infectious bacteria MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) is just a hospital or nursing home problem—think again. In recent years the stealth-like…

Angry outbursts appear to boost heart attack, stroke risk

People who have angry outbursts appear to be at increased risk of heart attack or stroke, especially within the first two hours of an outburst, according to a study by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and…

Student profile: Christina Nieves, SM '14

Q: Why did you choose HSPH? A: I chose HSPH because I wanted to go to a school with a strong epidemiology program and exceptional students and faculty. HSPH is one of the best public health schools in the country and the…

Prostate cancer: surgery vs. watchful waiting

For immediate release: Wednesday, March 5, 2014 Boston, MA -- More than 230,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year in the United States, but determining their course of treatment remains a source of considerable debate. A new study by…

Study finds coffee craving may be in the genes

A new study co-authored by HSPH researchers has identified a genetic propensity for caffeine consumption. The researchers discovered two genes that drive people to consume more or less caffeine depending on which variation of the genes they possess. HSPH authors of the…

Genetic profiling

David Hunter, Vincent L. Gregory Professor in Cancer Prevention and the Director of the Program in Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology, discusses the downsides of the growing popularity of personal genetic profiling.  (January 2008, 5:41) Please click the player icon above to play this…