Other Academic

Edward L. Giovannucci

Professor of Nutrition and Epidemiology

Nutrition

edward.giovannucci@channing.harvard.edu

Other Positions

Associate Professor of Medicine

Medicine

Brigham and Women's Hospital


Overview

My primary research efforts focus on how nutritional, hormonal, and genetic factors are related to various malignancies, especially those of the prostate and large bowel. Much of this work is based on the Nurses' Health Study, the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and the Physicians' Health Study cohorts. For prostate cancer, my work has centered on the role of specific antioxidants, particularly lycopene, and on the potentially deleterious effects of diets high in calcium and dietary fat. In addition to establishing risk factors, we have been interested in understanding etiologic mechanisms that will help provide a solid scientific rationale for preventive strategies. Specifically, I have studied how nutritional factors influence prostate cancer through modulating levels of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and binding proteins, insulin, vitamin D metabolites, and steroid hormones. More recently, our work has examined the role of obesity and energy balance in the progression of prostate cancer.

Regarding colorectal cancer, our work in the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study has established specific modifiable risk factors that contribute to over 70% of colorectal cancers. We have helped establish several factors that increase risk of colorectal cancer, including central obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, and diets high in red and processed meats. We have also hypothesized and demonstrated that some of these factors increase risk through higher insulin and IGF levels. We have also identified potential protective micronutrients, including vitamin D, folate, calcium and vitamin B6. We are testing the efficacy of some of these potentially protective agents, including folic acid, vitamin D, and vitamin B6 in randomized intervention trials.

Finally, we have undertaken the collection of tumor tissue blocks for prostate cancer and colorectal cancer and precursor lesions (adenomas) within the Nurses' Health Study, Physicians' Health Study, and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. With these specimens, we are identifying specific somatic molecular alterations in tumors. These alterations have been shown to have powerful influences on survival. We are now linking specific nutritional and lifestyle exposures to the probability of possessing certain of these tissue markers among those who develop cancer. Ultimately, we plan to provide the most comprehensive examination of the relations of dietary and other modifiable factors, hormonal factors, genetic susceptibility, and specific molecular endpoints in tumors. The great strength of our unique approach is to have updated and integrated data on all these factors, over up to a 30 year time period.

My research work is mostly funded through the National Institutes of Health (R01's, R21's, R03's, P01), all from the National Cancer Institute. I also have funding from the American Institute of Cancer Research. My major teaching effort has been as an instructor in two courses, Cancer Epidemiology and Nutritional Epidemiology of Cancer at the Harvard School of Public Health. I do not have clinical duties.


Bibliography

Trans-ancestry genome-wide association meta-analysis of prostate cancer identifies new susceptibility loci and informs genetic risk prediction.

Conti DV, Darst BF, Moss LC, Saunders EJ, Sheng X, Chou A, Schumacher FR, Olama AAA, Benlloch S, Dadaev T, Brook MN, Sahimi A, Hoffmann TJ, Takahashi A, Matsuda K, Momozawa Y, Fujita M, Muir K, Lophatananon A, Wan P, Le Marchand L, Wilkens LR, Stevens VL, Gapstur SM, Carter BD, Schleutker J, Tammela TLJ, Sipeky C, Auvinen A, Giles GG, Southey MC, MacInnis RJ, Cybulski C, Wokolorczyk D, Lubinski J, Neal DE, Donovan JL, Hamdy FC, Martin RM, Nordestgaard BG, Nielsen SF, Weischer M, Bojesen SE, Røder MA, Iversen P, Batra J, Chambers S, Moya L, Horvath L, Clements JA, Tilley W, Risbridger GP, Gronberg H, Aly M, Szulkin R, Eklund M, Nordström T, Pashayan N, Dunning AM, Ghoussaini M, Travis RC, Key TJ, Riboli E, Park JY, Sellers TA, Lin HY, Albanes D, Weinstein SJ, Mucci LA, Giovannucci E, Lindstrom S, Kraft P, Hunter DJ, Penney KL, Turman C, Tangen CM, Goodman PJ, Thompson IM, Hamilton RJ, Fleshner NE, Finelli A, Parent MÉ, Stanford JL, Ostrander EA, Geybels MS, Koutros S, Freeman LEB, Stampfer M, Wolk A, Håkansson N, Andriole GL, Hoover RN, Machiela MJ, Sørensen KD, Borre M, Blot WJ, Zheng W, Yeboah ED, Mensah JE, Lu YJ, Zhang HW, Feng N, Mao X, Wu Y, Zhao SC, Sun Z, Thibodeau SN, McDonnell SK, Schaid DJ, West CML, Burnet N, Barnett G, Maier C, Schnoeller T, Luedeke M, Kibel AS, Drake BF, Cussenot O, Cancel-Tassin G, Menegaux F, Truong T, Koudou YA, John EM, Grindedal EM, Maehle L, Khaw KT, Ingles SA, Stern MC, Vega A, Gómez-Caamaño A, Fachal L, Rosenstein BS, Kerns SL, Ostrer H, Teixeira MR, Paulo P, Brandão A, Watya S, Lubwama A, Bensen JT, Fontham ETH, Mohler J, Taylor JA, Kogevinas M, Llorca J, Castaño-Vinyals G, Cannon-Albright L, Teerlink CC, Huff CD, Strom SS, Multigner L, Blanchet P, Brureau L, Kaneva R, Slavov C, Mitev V, Leach RJ, Weaver B, Brenner H, Cuk K, Holleczek B, Saum KU, Klein EA, Hsing AW, Kittles RA, Murphy AB, Logothetis CJ, Kim J, Neuhausen SL, Steele L, Ding YC, Isaacs WB, Nemesure B, Hennis AJM, Carpten J, Pandha H, Michael A, De Ruyck K, De Meerleer G, Ost P, Xu J, Razack A, Lim J, Teo SH, Newcomb LF, Lin DW, Fowke JH, Neslund-Dudas C, Rybicki BA, Gamulin M, Lessel D, Kulis T, Usmani N, Singhal S, Parliament M, Claessens F, Joniau S, Van den Broeck T, Gago-Dominguez M, Castelao JE, Martinez ME, Larkin S, Townsend PA, Aukim-Hastie C, Bush WS, Aldrich MC, Crawford DC, Srivastava S, Cullen JC, Petrovics G, Casey G, Roobol MJ, Jenster G, van Schaik RHN, Hu JJ, Sanderson M, Varma R, McKean-Cowdin R, Torres M, Mancuso N, Berndt SI, Van Den Eeden SK, Easton DF, Chanock SJ, Cook MB, Wiklund F, Nakagawa H, Witte JS, Eeles RA, Kote-Jarai Z, Haiman CA.

Nat Genet. 2021 Jan. 53(1):65-75. PMID: 33398198

Association of Body Mass Index With Colorectal Cancer Risk by Genome-Wide Variants.

Campbell PT, Lin Y, Bien SA, Figueiredo JC, Harrison TA, Guinter MA, Berndt SI, Brenner H, Chan AT, Chang-Claude J, Gallinger SJ, Gapstur SM, Giles GG, Giovannucci E, Gruber SB, Gunter M, Hoffmeister M, Jacobs EJ, Jenkins MA, Le Marchand L, Li L, McLaughlin JR, Murphy N, Milne RL, Newcomb PA, Newton C, Ogino S, Potter JD, Rennert G, Rennert HS, Robinson J, Sakoda LC, Slattery ML, Song Y, White E, Woods MO, Casey G, Hsu L, Peters U.

J Natl Cancer Inst. 2021 Jan 04. 113(1):38-47. PMID: 32324875


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