Megan Murray
Secondary Faculty

Megan Murray

Professor in the Department of Epidemiology

Epidemiology

Other Positions

Ronda Stryker and William Johnston Professor of Global Health

Global Health and Social Medicine

Harvard Medical School

Associate Professor of Medicine

Medicine-Brigham and Women's Hospital

Harvard Medical School

Director of Research, Global Health & Social Medicine

Global Health and Social Medicine

Harvard Medical School


Overview

Megan Murray is an epidemiologist and an infectious disease physician with over 25 years of experience studying tuberculosis and other emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases. Dr. Murray is the Ronda Stryker and William Johnston Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Epidemiology at the Harvard Chan School of Public Health. She is also the director of the Research Core in the Department of Global health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Murray’s research focuses on host and pathogen specific determinants of TB infection, disease and treatment outcomes. Much of her research is done in collaboration with the non-governmental organization Partners in Health and its Peru-based sister organization Socios en Salud. The joint team uses bacterial and human genetic and genomic tools to identify variants of interest and to understand the mechanisms of their interactions.

In addition to her work in Peru, Dr. Murray has conducted field studies in South Africa, Russia, the US, India, Indonesia, Sierra Leone, Pakistan, Niger and Rwanda. She serves as an editor for PLoS Medicine and for the European Journal of Epidemiology. She is currently a member of the Mass Consortium for Pathogen Readiness leadership team as well as Harvard University’s Covid Monitoring Committee. She has also served on numerous other committees, including the WHO’s TB-STAG, the Stop TB MDR Working Group, Harvard University Human Subjects Committee, the University’s Pandemic Flu Advisory Committee, the Institute of Medicine committee on Gulf War and Infectious Diseases, and multiple NIH study sections.


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