Topic: heart disease

Mediterranean diet linked to longer life

The Mediterranean diet, already considered one of the healthiest diets because of its link to reduced risk of heart disease, cancer, and other chronic diseases, has a new feather in its cap. A study by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and…

Trans fats linked to memory damage

A new study shows that eating trans fats may be associated with memory loss, according to a study presented last week at the American Heart Association scientific sessions. Trans fats, also known as partially hydrogenated vegetable oil and vegetable shortening, were included…

New online calculator estimates cardiovascular disease risk

For immediate release: Friday, November 14, 2014 Boston, MA — The new Healthy Heart Score developed by researchers at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) gives individuals an easy method to estimate their 20-year risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) based on simple…

Police face higher risk of sudden cardiac death during stressful duties

For immediate release: November 18, 2014 Boston, MA — Police officers in the United States face roughly 30 to 70 times higher risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) when they’re involved in stressful situations—suspect restraints, altercations, or chases—than when they’re involved in…

Women dismiss heart disease warning signs more than men

Women are more likely than men to dismiss chest pain that signals heart problems and to delay seeking medical help, even though heart disease is a leading cause of death for both women and men, according to a Harvard School of Public…

Instant noodle consumption linked to heart risk in women

Women who consume instant noodles frequently were found to be more likely to have metabolic syndrome—the group of risk factors, including obesity and high blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar, that increase the risk of heart disease and diabetes—according to a new…

Breakfast and heart disease risk

July 2013 -- A new study led by HSPH researchers Leah Cahill and Eric Rimm finds that skipping breakfast led to a 27% increase in coronary heart disease risk among men. (Conversations on Public Health podcast series, 8:06)   Please click the…

Harvard Public Health Magazine Extra: Social Capital & Health

April 2014 - Roseto, Pennsylvania was settled by Italian immigrants who were found to have astonishingly low rates of heart disease in the 1950s. Ichiro Kawachi, chair of HSPH's Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, explains why Roseto is a cautionary tale…