Lemongrass Marinated Chicken Breast with Olive Couscous

Chicken couscousRecipe courtesy of Ming Tsai

Serves 4

  • 4 skin-on Statler chicken breasts, organic, naturally raised, free range and/or kosher
  • 5 stalks lemongrass, minced (white part only)
  • 2 shallots, minced
  • ½ cup white wine
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more to cook
  • 1½ cups instant whole wheat couscous
  • 2¼ cups water, boiling
  • ¼ cup chopped black olives
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

More Recipes on The Nutrition Source

Pre-heat the oven to 375 °F.

In a large zip-top bag, combine chicken, lemongrass, shallots, white wine and extra virgin olive oil and marinate for 30 minutes. Remove chicken to a plate and season with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper. Reserve the marinade to make a pan sauce with later.

In an oven-proof sauté pan over medium heat coated lightly with extra-virgin olive oil, sear the chicken, skin-side down, until browned. Flip chicken and finish in the oven.

Meanwhile, make the couscous: Place couscous in large, heat-proof bowl. Pour boiling water over couscous, add 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Stir quickly to blend and immediately cover bowl with plastic wrap, sealing tightly, and allow to steam until couscous is tender, about 5 minutes. Fluff couscous with the back of a fork.

Remove chicken breasts from pan and let rest 5 minutes. Place pan back on stove and transfer remaining marinade to the pan and bring to a boil. Add olives and about 1 tablespoon olive oil, stir to combine and heat through.

Serve family-style by placing chicken breasts over couscous. Garnish by spooning pan sauce over chicken.

Nutritional information per serving:

Calories: 570 ⁄ Protein: 39 g ⁄ Carbohydrate: 58 g ⁄ Fiber: 6 g ⁄ Sodium: 190 mg
Saturated fat: 4 g ⁄ Polyunsaturated fat: 3 g ⁄ Monounsaturated fat: 11 g
Trans fat: 0 g ⁄ Cholesterol: 80 mg

 

Ming Tsai

 

Chef and owner of Blue Ginger restaurant in Wellesley, Ming Tsai is the host and executive producer of the popular public television cooking show, “Simply Ming“. He is also a member of the Harvard School of Public Health Nutrition Round Table.

Recipe from Season 5 of “Simply Ming”
Copyright © 2007, Ming Tsai
Photo: Christophor Cavalieri

   

Terms of Use

The aim of the Harvard School of Public Health Nutrition Source is to provide timely information on diet and nutrition for clinicians, allied health professionals, and the public. The contents of this Web site are not intended to offer personal medical advice. You should seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this Web site. The information does not mention brand names, nor does it endorse any particular products.