Simple Celery Date Salad

Recipe courtesy of Mollie Katzen/Harvard University Dining Services

Serves 2Celery (celery-on-cutting-board.jpg)

  • 3 large stalks celery, very thinly sliced (okay to include some of the nicer leaves)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice (plus more for pear slices, if desired)
  • 4 to 6 dates, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon light-colored honey (optional-but really good)
  • Salt (optional)
  • Black pepper
  • 1 to 2 ounces high-quality blue cheese, crumbled (optional)
  • Pear slices for garnish (optional)

Toss together the celery, olive oil, lemon juice, dates, and honey (if using). Add salt to taste, if desired (although its a good idea to leave it out if you are planning to include the cheese). Sprinkle with black pepper and toss again. At this point, the salad can be covered and refrigerated for up to two days.

Serve cold, with a little blue cheese crumbled on top, if desired, and with slices of pear tucked into the side, if using; tossing the pear slices with lemon juice prior to plating will help keep them from turning brown. Pass a pepper mill.

Note: If you add the blue cheese sooner, it blends into the dressing. If you wait and then sprinkle it on top at serving, it will be more distinct. It’s your call, as this is good either way. It’s also fine with no cheese added at all.

Try these other vegetarian recipes from Mollie Katzen and Harvard University Dining Services:

Nutritional information per serving (with blue cheese and no added salt): 

Calories: 270 ⁄ Protein: 7 g ⁄ Carbohydrate: 27 g ⁄ Fiber: 4 g
Sodium: 420 mg  Saturated fat: 6 g ⁄ Polyunsaturated fat: 1 g
Monounsaturated fat: 8 g Trans fat: 0 g ⁄ Cholesterol: 20 mg

Nutritional information per serving (without blue cheese and no added salt): 

Calories: 170 ⁄ Protein: 1 g ⁄ Carbohydrate: 27 g ⁄ Fiber: 4 g
*Sodium: 25 mg Saturated fat: 1 g ⁄ Polyunsaturated fat: 0.5 g
Monounsaturated fat: 6 g Trans fat: 0 g ⁄ Cholesterol: 0 mg

*Adding a dash of salt adds about 40 mg of sodium per serving.


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