Rich Vegetable Stock

carrot and celeryRecipe courtesy of John Ash

Yields about 1 gallon or 16 1-cup servings

If you buy vegetable stock, you’ll likely get a product with a lot of sodium but not a lot of flavor. By making your own stock, you can control the amount of sodium and create an incredibly flavorful base for soups, stews, risottos, and other dishes that call for stock as the primary cooking liquid.

  • 8 cups sliced white onions
  • 4 cups diced carrots
  • 4 cups sliced leeks
  • 3 cups parsnips
  • 2 cups sliced celery stalks, including leafy tops
  • ¼ cup chopped garlic
  • ½ cup canola oil or extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 gallons (32 cups) water
  • 3 cups dry white wine
  • 1 ounce dry mushrooms
  • 4 cups chopped fresh tomatoes
  • 2 teaspoons whole black pepper corns
  • 6 bay leaves
  • 2 cups parsley leaves and stems, roughly chopped
  • 1 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or sea salt

In a large pot add the onions, carrots, celery, leeks, parsnips, garlic, and olive or canola oil, and very lightly brown over moderate heat. Add remaining ingredients, bring to the boil, reduce heat and simmer partially covered for 1½ hours.

Correct seasoning with salt and pepper, strain, cool, and refrigerate or freeze. (You can use the strained vegetables as a base for a pureed vegetable soup. Simply place the strained vegetables and some of the stock in a blender. Blend until smooth, adding stock to get the desired consistency, heat and serve.)

Nutritional information per serving:

Calories: 100 ⁄ Protein: 2 g ⁄ Carbohydrate: 4 g ⁄ Fiber: 1 g ⁄ Sodium: 190 mg ⁄ Potassium: 560 mg
Saturated fat: 1 g ⁄ Polyunsaturated fat: 2 g ⁄ Monounsaturated fat: 4.5 g ⁄
Trans fat: 0 g ⁄ Cholesterol: 0 mg

Find more delicious recipes that spare the salt from The Culinary Institute of America and the Harvard School of Public Health.

Copyright © John Ash

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