Diet Reviews

Diet book with fork and knife on table

From bookstores to social media to blogs, there’s no shortage of information on diet. So how to differentiate what “works” from an overhyped fad?

It’s important to remember that even if a particular diet may be successful for one person, it may not be effective for another due to individual differences in genes and lifestyle. And while research shows that calories matter, focusing on food quality is an equally important part of preventing weight gain and promoting weight loss. Diets are also more likely to be successful when they are easier to follow, so tailoring a strategy to suit your own lifestyle is key.

Still, when faced with the seemingly endless promotion of weight-loss strategies and diet plans, it helps to see what evidence is supporting them. In this series, we take a look at some popular diets and approaches to eating—and review the research behind them.

DASH Diet

The DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet is sometimes prescribed by doctors to help treat high blood pressure, however numerous studies show wide-ranging health benefits of this eating pattern. Learn more about DASH: how it works, potential pitfalls, and what the research says.

Gluten-Free for Weight Loss

A gluten-free diet eliminates all foods containing or contaminated with gluten. As the sole treatment for the 1-2% of Americans who have celiac disease, this diet is not new. What is newand driving these sales upwardis the use of a gluten-free diet for weight loss. Learn more about a gluten-free diet: how it works, potential pitfalls, and what the research says about this strategy for weight loss. 

Intermittent Fasting for Weight Loss

Intermittent fasting is a diet regimen that cycles between brief periods of fasting, with either no food or significant calorie reduction, and periods of unrestricted eating. The most common methods are fasting on alternate days, for whole days with a specific frequency per week, or during a set time frame. Learn more about intermittent fasting: how it works, potential pitfalls, and what the research says about this strategy for weight loss. 

Ketogenic Diet for Weight Loss

The ketogenic or “keto” diet is a low-carbohydrate, fat-rich eating plan that has been used for centuries to treat specific medical conditions. However in recent years, this diet has gained considerable attention as a potential weight-loss strategy. Learn more about the keto diet: how it works, potential pitfalls, and what the research says about this strategy for weight loss. 

Mediterranean Diet

The Mediterranean diet is a primarily plant-based eating plan that includes daily intake of whole grains, olive oil, fruits, vegetables, beans and other legumes, nuts, herbs, and spices. Other foods like animal proteins are eaten in smaller quantities, with the preferred animal protein being fish and seafood. It does not specify portion sizes or specific amounts, as it is up to the individual to decide exactly how much food to eat at each meal. Learn more about the Mediterranean diet: how it works, potential pitfalls, and what the research says.

Mindful Eating

This approach to eating focuses on the eating experience, body-related sensations, and thoughts and feelings about food, with heightened awareness and without judgment. Attention is paid to the foods being chosen, internal and external physical cues, and your responses to those cues. Learn more about the mindful eating: how it works, potential pitfalls, and what the available research says.

Paleo Diet for Weight Loss

The Paleolithic or “Paleo” diet seeks to address 21st century ills by revisiting the way humans ate during the Paleolithic era more than 2 million years ago. Paleo proponents state that because our genetics and anatomy have changed very little since the Stone Age, we should eat foods available during that time to promote good health. Learn more about the Paleo diet: how it works, potential pitfalls, and what the research says about this strategy for weight loss. 

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