Events and News

Zika epidemic forcing scientists to rethink assumptions about human biology

On April 13, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) joined the World Health Organization (WHO) in confirming a link between Zika and the severe birth defect microcephaly. While officials at WHO also believe that there is enough evidence to conclude that the virus causes the autoimmune nervous disorder Guillain-Barré syndrome, the CDC is waiting … Continue reading “Zika epidemic forcing scientists to rethink assumptions about human biology”

Researchers optimistic about malaria vaccine progress

While the world is as close as it has ever been to having a malaria vaccine, the fight to eradicate the disease is far from over. That was the consensus among experts in the field who gathered at a forum hosted by Harvard’s Defeating Malaria: From the Genes to the Globe initiative on April 6, 2016. Focused … Continue reading “Researchers optimistic about malaria vaccine progress”

Theresa Betancourt, Dyann Wirth honored at annual Alice Hamilton lecture

Theresa Betancourt discussed her research on the role of conflict, adversity, and resiliency in children at the Sixth Annual Alice Hamilton Award Lecture on April 5, 2016 in Kresge Cafeteria. Following her talk, Betancourt, associate professor of child health and human rights and director of the Research Program on Children and Global Adversity at Harvard … Continue reading “Theresa Betancourt, Dyann Wirth honored at annual Alice Hamilton lecture”

Botswana study shows 96% rate of viral suppression for patients on HIV drugs

Botswana appears to have achieved very high rates of HIV diagnosis, treatment, and viral suppression—much better than most Western nations, including the United States—according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and colleagues in Botswana. The findings suggest that even in countries with limited resources where a large percentage of the population … Continue reading “Botswana study shows 96% rate of viral suppression for patients on HIV drugs”

Special cells can “taste,” then help fight parasites in the gut

What spurs the human immune system into action when there’s a parasitic infection in the gut? A new study finds that special cells called tuft cells play a big role—by “tasting” the presence of intestinal parasites and setting the immune system into motion against them. The finding, outlined in a paper published February 2, 2016 … Continue reading “Special cells can “taste,” then help fight parasites in the gut”

Link between Zika virus and microcephaly strengthened

New research has found evidence of the Zika virus in the brain tissue of a fetus with microcephaly, providing support for a link between the mosquito-borne disease and a birth defect that causes small heads and underdeveloped brains. According to an editorial that accompanied the study, both published online February 10, 2016 in The New … Continue reading “Link between Zika virus and microcephaly strengthened”

Zika virus in Brazil may be mutated strain

The mosquito-borne Zika virus has been linked to a surge in cases of birth defects in Brazil, and is spreading in other countries in the southern hemisphere. Flaminia Catteruccia, associate professor of immunology and infectious diseases at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, says the virus may have adapted to the human environment and … Continue reading “Zika virus in Brazil may be mutated strain”

Targeting fat-tissue hormone may lead to type 2 diabetes treatment

A new study by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and colleagues describes the pre-clinical development of a therapeutic that could potentially be used to treat type 2 diabetes, fatty liver disease, and other metabolic diseases. The researchers developed an antibody that improves glucose regulation and reduces fatty liver in obese mice … Continue reading “Targeting fat-tissue hormone may lead to type 2 diabetes treatment”