New Study Analyzes the Cost-Effectiveness of Mexico’s Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Excise Tax

A new paper, “Cost-Effectiveness Of The Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Excise Tax in Mexico” was released today in Health Affairs. In 2014, Mexico imposed an excise tax of 1 peso per liter on sugar-sweetened beverages. Ana Basto-Abreu of Mexico’s National Institute of Public Health is the lead author, along with Steve Gortmaker of the Harvard T.H. Chan … Continue reading “New Study Analyzes the Cost-Effectiveness of Mexico’s Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Excise Tax”

CHOICES Study Analyzes and Gathers Stakeholder Input on Two Obesity Prevention Policies in Maine

A new paper from CHOICES, “Cost-Effectiveness Analysis and Stakeholder Evaluation of 2 Obesity Prevention Policies in Maine, US” was released today in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior. Obesity prevention is a priority item for many policymakers at the state level. This study modeled two obesity prevention strategies in the state of Maine – … Continue reading “CHOICES Study Analyzes and Gathers Stakeholder Input on Two Obesity Prevention Policies in Maine”

STUDY: Evidence to Inform a Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy

A study from the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health used data from the U.S. Census and the American Community Survey to look at how people ages 16 and older got to and from work over time between 2000 and 2016 in counties with populations of at least 100,000 people. The authors calculated … Continue reading “STUDY: Evidence to Inform a Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy”

STUDY: Trends in Obesity Among Children in WIC Since Food Package Changes

A new study from the CHOICES Project at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health analyzed how trends in obesity among children participating in WIC changed after food package changes were enacted in 2009. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the changes made to the foods that could be purchased … Continue reading “STUDY: Trends in Obesity Among Children in WIC Since Food Package Changes”

Brief – The Cost-Effectiveness of Interventions for Reducing Obesity among Young Children through Healthy Eating, Physical Activity, and Screen Time

A new brief from the CHOICES Project at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health in partnership with Healthy Eating Research (HER) provides an overview on the evidence thus far for the strategies with the lowest cost for the most health impact to prevent obesity in the places where very young children live, learn, … Continue reading “Brief – The Cost-Effectiveness of Interventions for Reducing Obesity among Young Children through Healthy Eating, Physical Activity, and Screen Time”

Study – Early Adopters: State Approaches to Testing School Drinking Water for Lead in the United States

A study from the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health conducted in conjunction with researchers from the Nutrition Policy Institute at the University of California describes the features of statewide initiatives in operation between January 1, 2016 and February 28, 2018 in 24 states and the District of Columbia to conduct testing for … Continue reading “Study – Early Adopters: State Approaches to Testing School Drinking Water for Lead in the United States”

STUDY: Community-Based Policies and Support for Free Drinking Water Access in Outdoor Areas in the U.S.

This authors of this study examined community-level characteristics associated with free drinking water access policies in U.S. municipalities using data from a nationally representative survey of city managers/officials from 2,029 local governments in 2014. Outcomes were 4 free drinking water access policies. Explanatory measures were population size, rural/urban status, census region, poverty prevalence, education, and … Continue reading “STUDY: Community-Based Policies and Support for Free Drinking Water Access in Outdoor Areas in the U.S.”

STUDY: Industry-Related Research Appears Biased to Underestimate the Adverse Health Effects of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages (SSBs)

Objective: The authors of this study sought to determine the extent to which financial conflicts of interest involving the food industry may have biased nutrition studies. To explore this question, they conducted research involving sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) as a test case, focusing on a period during which scientific consensus about the adverse health effects of SSB emerged from … Continue reading “STUDY: Industry-Related Research Appears Biased to Underestimate the Adverse Health Effects of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages (SSBs)”

STUDY: Predictors of Nutrition Quality in Early Child Education Settings in Connecticut

Objective: This study assessed the dietary quality of lunches and feeding practices (family-style service, teacher role modeling) in Connecticut child care centers and made comparisons by center participation in the federal Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Design: Plate waste methods and visual observation of lunches served and consumed. Setting: A total of 97 randomly … Continue reading “STUDY: Predictors of Nutrition Quality in Early Child Education Settings in Connecticut”