HPRC News & Events

EVENT: HPRC Community Partners Meeting

Technology and Childhood Obesity: The Good, the Bad, and the Possible

Highlights from the meeting will be shared on Twitter via @HarvardPRC. Join in on the conversation with #technobesity.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16TH, 2013
8:00AM-1:30PM
MIT CAMPUS ACTIVITIES COMPLEX
3RD FLOOR, MEZZANINE LOUNGE, ROOM W20-307
77 MASSACHUSETTS AVE
CAMBRIDGE MA 02139

Featured Keynote Speakers:

Screen Proliferation and the Childhood Obesity Epidemic: Connections, Projections, and Solutions Ahead

Dr. Michael Rich, M.D., M.P.H.
Director of the Center on Media and Child Health, Boston Children’s Hospital; Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical at School; Associate Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health

Selling Junk Food to Kids in the Digital Age

Cara Wilking, J.D.
Senior Staff Attorney at Public Health Advocacy Institute

Concurrent Workshops

  • How to control technology
  • Technology for obesity research
  • Social media and social marketing

*Registration and a light breakfast will begin at 8:00 am. Lunch will be provided during the concurrent workshops.

*Parking will be available at 252 Albany Street Parking Lot at no charge.

Print Invitation

Questions? Please contact:
Jenny Reiner
jfreiner@hsph.harvard.edu
617-384-8919

Spotlight on WATER

The recent launch of First Lady Michelle Obama’s and Partnership for a Healthier America’s “Drink Up” campaign has made H2O a focus of national conversation.

Water access and consumption is one of HPRC’s five identified key targets for girl_drinking_fountain_000001809540xsmall-1obesity prevention. From the national down to the local level,  we have plenty of resources to contribute to the discussion:

Out of School Time Nutrition and Physical Activity Initiative (OSNAP) Resources:

NOPREN Water Access Working Group
The Water Access working group focuses on policies and economic issues regarding free and safe water access.

Articles
Cradock AL, Wilking C, Olliges S, Gortmaker G. Getting Back on Tap: The Policy Context and Cost of Ensuring Access to Low-Cost Drinking Water in Massachusetts Schools. Am J Prev Med. 2012 Sep;43(3 Suppl 2):S95-101.

Giles CM, Kenney EL, Gortmaker SL, Lee RM, Thayer JC, Mont-Ferguson H, Cradock AL. Increasing Water Availability During Afterschool Snack: Evidence, Strategies, and Partnerships from a Group Randomized Trial. Am J Prev Med. 2012 Sep;43(3 Suppl 2):S136-42.

Kids may not offset extra exercise at school

(Reuters Health) – Children who exercise at school don’t make up for the extra effort by being less active at home, according to a new U.S. study that used accelerometers to track kids’ activity levels.

“What this argues for is we should be increasing activity in schools,” said Michael Long, the lead author of the new study and a post-doctoral research fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, Massachusetts.

Read the full article 

Dr. Michele Polacsek & MYOC featured by NCI’s “Research to Reality” online community!

The Maine Youth Overweight Collaborative’s (MYOC) toolkit, “Keep ME Heatlhy” has now been included in the National Cancer Institute’s online community “Research to Reality (R2R).”

Join in the discussion about Keep ME Healthy and redressing the childhood obesity pandemic with July’s featured R2R Partner Dr. Michele Polacsek.

VIDEO: Dr. Steven Gortmaker featured in NEJM roundtable discussion on “Health Promotion and the State”

“Some major U.S. public health problems are perpetuated and exacerbated at least in part by lifestyle choices and individual behavior. Policymakers at all levels of government are struggling to find ways of intervening to promote wellness and reduce unhealthy behaviors without overstepping the limits of their authority or infringing on personal liberties. What can and should government do to reduce obesity and tobacco use?”

Watch experts Thomas Farley, Steven Gortmaker, and Cass Sunstein address these and other questions about health promotion and the state in this video roundtable discussion