HPRC News & Events

Kids may not offset extra exercise at school

(Reuters Health) – Children who exercise at school don’t make up for the extra effort by being less active at home, according to a new U.S. study that used accelerometers to track kids’ activity levels.

“What this argues for is we should be increasing activity in schools,” said Michael Long, the lead author of the new study and a post-doctoral research fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, Massachusetts.

Read the full article 

Dr. Michele Polacsek & MYOC featured by NCI’s “Research to Reality” online community!

The Maine Youth Overweight Collaborative’s (MYOC) toolkit, “Keep ME Heatlhy” has now been included in the National Cancer Institute’s online community “Research to Reality (R2R).”

Join in the discussion about Keep ME Healthy and redressing the childhood obesity pandemic with July’s featured R2R Partner Dr. Michele Polacsek.

VIDEO: Dr. Steven Gortmaker featured in NEJM roundtable discussion on “Health Promotion and the State”

“Some major U.S. public health problems are perpetuated and exacerbated at least in part by lifestyle choices and individual behavior. Policymakers at all levels of government are struggling to find ways of intervening to promote wellness and reduce unhealthy behaviors without overstepping the limits of their authority or infringing on personal liberties. What can and should government do to reduce obesity and tobacco use?”

Watch experts Thomas Farley, Steven Gortmaker, and Cass Sunstein address these and other questions about health promotion and the state in this video roundtable discussion

Boston launches ad campaign against sugary beverages

(The Boston Globe) — “Mayor Thomas M. Menino of Boston and public health authorities unveiled a public awareness campaign…that urges residents to reduce consumption of sweetened beverages…The campaign, which will include a media blitz, premieres a month before an executive order by Menino phases out the sale, advertising, and promotion of sugar-sweetened beverages in all city buildings…The…federally funded campaign will blanket Boston…[and] focus on black and Latino neighborhoods.”