Topic: nutrition

Report compares dietary fat intake among countries

April 17, 2014—Harvard School of Public Health researchers and colleagues have compiled the first global data on dietary intakes of specific fats worldwide. The report compares the intake of saturated fat, cholesterol, trans fats, omega 3s, and other fats and oils among…

More TV watching may mean less sleep for children

A study that followed more than 1,800 children from ages 6 months to nearly 8 years found a small but consistent association between increased television viewing and shorter sleep duration. The report, by investigators at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and…

Chefs and scientists partner to promote healthy, sustainable food

Harvard School of Public Health nutrition researchers teamed with the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) in 2013 to create the Menus of Change initiative, which integrates the latest findings from both nutrition and environmental science into a single set of recommendations for…

Fats: Controversy and Consensus

Fats have been in the news recently following a paper published in the Annals of Internal Medicine questioning recommendations on limiting saturated fat intake, which was covered by many media outlets, including by New York Times columnist Mark Bittman in a column…

Protein

Protein is found throughout the body—in muscle, bone, skin, hair, and virtually every other body part or tissue. It makes up the enzymes that power many chemical reactions and the hemoglobin that carries oxygen in your blood. At least 10,000 different proteins…

Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates: quality matters What’s most important is the type of carbohydrate you chose to eat because some sources are healthier than others. The amount of carbohydrate in the diet – high or low – is less important than the type of carbohydrate in the diet. For example, healthy, whole…

Low-Fat Diet Not a Cure-All

Results from large, long Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification Trial shows no effect on heart disease, breast cancer, colorectal cancer, or weight. The low-fat, high-starch diet that was the focus of dietary advice during the 1990s-as reflected by the USDA food guide…

Economic growth no cure for child undernutrition

For immediate release: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 Boston, MA — A large study of child growth patterns in 36 developing countries finds that, contrary to widely held beliefs, economic growth has little to no effect on the nutritional status of the world’s…