B Vitamins

You’re probably familiar with Vitamin B6 and B12, but did you know there are actually eight B vitamins?

These vitamins help a variety of enzymes do their jobs, ranging from releasing energy from carbohydrates and fat to breaking down amino acids and transporting oxygen and energy-containing nutrients around the body.

Spotlight on Three of the Bs: Folate, Vitamin B6, and Vitamin B12

One of the advances that changed the way we look at vitamins was the discovery that too little folate is linked to birth defects such as spina bifida and anencephaly.

Foods rich in folate (vitamin B9) including beans, broccoli, shellfish, peanuts, liver, nuts, and spinach

Folate (Folic Acid) – Vitamin B9

Folate is the natural form of vitamin B9, water-soluble and naturally found in many foods. It is also added to foods and sold as a supplement in the form of folic acid; this form is actually better absorbed than that from food sources—85% vs. 50%, respectively.
Learn more about folate and health

Another line of research about folate and two other B vitamins, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12, explores their roles in reducing some types of cancer and heart disease.

Foods naturally containing vitamin b6, including bananas, salmon, liver, tuna, chickpeas, poultry, dark leafy greens, bananas

Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6, or pyridoxine, is a water-soluble vitamin found naturally in many foods, as well as added to foods and supplements.
Learn more about vitamin B6 and health
Foods naturally containing vitamin b12, including fish, shellfish, liver, meat, eggs, poultry, and dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt.

Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12, or cobalamin, is naturally found in animal foods. It can also be added to foods or supplements. Vitamin B12 is needed to form red blood cells and DNA. It is also a key player in the function and development of brain and nerve cells.
Learn more about vitamin B12 and health

Related

Vitamins and Minerals

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