Guidelines for Pregnancy-Related Weight Gain

Excessive weight gain during pregnancy is more common now than it was in 1990 when the Institute of Medicine first offered recommendations for pregnancy-related weight gain. (1) New guidelines from the Institute of Medicine steer clinicians and women to more moderate weight gain goals during pregnancy for women who are obese. (2)

Table: Guidelines for Pregnancy-Related Weight Gain, 1990 and 2009
1990 IOM Report 2009 IOM Report
Weight

Category

Prepregnancy

BMI (kg/m2)

Overall

Weight

Gain

(lbs)

Prepregnancy

BMI (kg/m2)

Overall

Weight

Gain

(lbs)

2nd and 3rd

Trimester Rate

of Weight Gain

(lbs/week)

Underweight <19.8 28–40 <18.5 28–40 1
Normal

Weight

19.8–26.0 28–40 18.5–

24.9

25–35 1
Overweight 26.0–29.0 15–25 25.0–

29.9

15–25 0.6
Obese >29.0 At least 15 >30 11–20 0.5

Source: (1, 2)

Back to the article, “Prenatal and Early Life Influences on Adult Weight and Obesity

References

1. Institute of Medicine. Nutrition during pregnancy: part I: weight gain, part II: nutrient supplements. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 1990.

2. Institute of Medicine. Weight gain during pregnancy: reexamining the guidelines. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 2009.

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