Birth weight is a larger contributor to height than the socio-economic conditions in which a child grows up

Former Pop Center student Aditi Krishna is lead author on a new study in Economics & Human Biology that examines the role of birth weight in childrens’ height; Lisa Berkman, Gunther Fink, and SV Subramanian are co-authors. The study shows that prenatal conditions, reflected in birth weight, are more important in setting height trajectories in comparison to postnatal factors, which … Continue reading “Birth weight is a larger contributor to height than the socio-economic conditions in which a child grows up”

Multi-level analysis finds “micro-geographies” of child undernutrition in India

Four Harvard Pop Center researchers, including research associate Iván Mejía-Guevara, PhD,  recent doctoral program graduate Aditi Krishna, PhD, former Bell Fellow Daniel Corsi, PhD, and faculty member SV Subramanian, PhD, are authors on a paper published in the Journal of South Asian Development that evaluates child undernutrition in India by level – individual, community and … Continue reading “Multi-level analysis finds “micro-geographies” of child undernutrition in India”

Early life poverty affects physical growth faltering, or stunting, in young & older children

Harvard Pop Center researchers, including doctoral student Aditi Krishna and S V Subramanian, PhD, have published a study in the journal Global Health Action that examines how early life poverty affects physical growth over various life stages, with ages ranging from 6 months – 15 years.

Are socioeconomic & demographic factors driving inequalities in BMI at the population level? Maybe not.

Harvard Bell Fellow Fahad Razak, MD, Pop Center faculty member S V Subramanian (Subu), PhD, and Pop Center doctoral student Aditi Krishna are authors of a study in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition that explores population-level changes in the BMI distribution over time, looking carefully at inequalities in weight gain between groups vs. within … Continue reading “Are socioeconomic & demographic factors driving inequalities in BMI at the population level? Maybe not.”