Early childhood social disadvantage linked to risky health behaviors in adulthood

A new study by former Harvard RWJF Health & Society Scholar Amy Non, and Pop Center faculty member Laura Kubzansky published in the Annals of Human Biology finds that children who experienced early social disadvantage were, as adults, almost four times as likely to smoke, three times more likely to be obese, and almost five … Continue reading “Early childhood social disadvantage linked to risky health behaviors in adulthood”

An epigenetic “primer” for social scientists interested in link between genome & environment

Harvard RWJF Health & Society Scholar program alumna Amy Non, PhD, is co-author of a study published in the American Journal of Human Biology that serves as a type of primer for anthropologists and human biologists interested in incorporating epigenetic (chemical modifications to the genome that may alter gene expression) data into their research programs.

The Impact of Childhood Social Disadvantage

How does social disadvantage in childhood correlate to cardiometabolic function and chronic disease status 40 years down the line? RWJF alumna Amy Non, along with Pop Center faculty members Ichiro Kawachi, Matthew Gilman, and Laura Kubzansky, take a look at how adverse social environments in early life play out across the life course. The study … Continue reading “The Impact of Childhood Social Disadvantage”