Tag Archives: Rebecca Thurston

For sexually active women, age not a factor in their sexual satisfaction

thurstonRWJF Health & Society program alumna Rebecca Thurston, PhD, is co-author on a study published in the Annals of Family Medicine that found that for women, sexual satisfaction is influenced more by the quality of their relationship, their communication with their partner, and the importance they place on sex than by their age.

Higher emotional vitality associated with lower risk of stroke

KubzanskyHarvard Pop Center faculty member Laura Kubzansky, PhD, and Robert Wood Johnson Health & Society Scholars program alumna Rebecca Thurston, PhD, are authors on a paper in Health Psychology that expands on the research linking positive psychological health with lower risk for heart disease to explore the impact of emotional vitality on risk of stroke.

More frequent overnight menopausal hot flashes linked with increased brain scan changes

thurstonRebecca Thurston, PhD, Harvard Robert Wood Johnson Health & Society Scholar program alumna, is lead author on a study published in Menopause that explores a link between brain health (measured by white matter hyperintensities (WMH)) and menopausal hot flashes. The study has received attention in Neurosciencenews.com, Sleep Review, MedicalXpress, University Herald, and HealthNewsDigest.com. And this mention in The Wall Street Journal.

Earlier & frequent hot flashes may be linked to increased risk for cardiovascular disease

thurstonFormer Harvard Robert Wood Johnson Health & Society Scholar Rebecca Thurston, PhD, is lead author on two studies, both to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s annual Scientific Session in San Diego March 14 – 16, 2015, that suggest that early and frequent menopausal hot flashes may be linked to increased risk for heart disease. These findings, which focus on endothelial (the inner lining of blood vessels) function, have been receiving attention in the press; learn more from cbsnews.com, medicalxpress.com, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, and DailyRx.com.

Can we predict how long phase of menopausal hot flashes & night sweats will last?

thurstonHarvard RWJF Health & Society Scholar alumna Rebecca Thurston, PhD, is co-author of a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine that found that more than half of the women in the study who experienced frequent vasomotor symptoms (VMS) – which include hot flashes and night sweats – experienced these symptoms for more than 7 years. African American women reported the longest duration of symptoms, compared to other racial/ethnic groups. Women who experienced frequent symptoms early in premenopause or perimenopause, who also experienced greater negative affective factors, such as depressive symptoms and anxiety, had a higher chance of hot flashes spanning over an even longer duration. The study has received attention in newsworks.org.

Childhood sexual abuse linked to heart disease risk in women

sadRWJF alumna Rebecca Thurston has published a study which reveals that psychosocial stress brought on by early life adversities may have implications for the development of risk factors for heart disease later on. The study results have been reported in multiple media outlets, including US News & World Report.

Thurston’s Study on Hot Flashes and Weight Loss in the News

thurstonA study by Harvard RWJF Scholar Alum Rebecca Clark Thurston, PhD,  on the connection between a reduction in menopausal hot flashes and weight loss has received some press in The Pittsburgh Business Times. The study has been published in the July online issue of Menopause.

Thurston examines link between MetS and subclinical atherosclerosis

Rebecca Thurston,  a former RWJF scholar at the Harvard Pop Center, has co-authored a study (based on participants in The Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation) recently published in Circulation, a journal of the American Heart Association, that examines the association between MetS  (the metabolic syndrome) and subclinical atherosclerosis, and the role that race/ethnicity in midlife women may play.

A reason to reduce anxiety, and an opportunity to do so!

We’ve long known that anxiety puts people at risk for coronary heart disease, but now a nationally representative longitudinal study of the US population has shown that anxiety also increases the risk of stroke. Pop Center faculty member Laura Kubzansky and RWJF alum Rebecca Thurston co-authored the study, which was published in Stroke.

And speaking of reducing anxiety, please join us for a cup of tea on April 28th, when we kick off our 50th Anniversary celebration with an Open House and Reception. All are welcome!