Work and Well-Being Initiative researchers publish op-ed in Harvard Business Review

Work Design for Health logo

Erin L. Kelly, Lisa F. Berkman, Laura D. Kubzansky, and Meg Lovejoy have published an op-ed in the Harvard Business Review that distills the findings of a research review and the resulting “work design for health” framework and employer toolkit (made available to the public on the workwellbeinginitiative.org website) down to “7 Strategies to Improve Your Employees’ Health and Well-Being.”

Introducing our three new Bell Fellows!

Three new Bell Fellows_2021_2023 cohort

We are so pleased to welcome— and introduce— the three new David E. Bell Fellows that comprise the 2021-2023 cohort. These fellows, who have academic backgrounds in disciplines ranging from epidemiology, to demography and sociology, will enrich our collaborative community here at the Harvard Pop Center, while they strive to advance population health science research. Brittney Butler holds a doctorate in epidemiology from The Ohio State University, and an MPH…

“Work Design for Health” framework & toolkit developed by researchers offers employers effective alternative to employee wellness programs

Work Design for Health logo

Harvard Pop Center Director Lisa Berkman, PhD, Research Program Director Meg Lovejoy, PhD, and their colleagues at the MIT Sloan School of Management, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, have developed and released a public-facing website that features a toolkit that employers can use to invest in the health and happiness of their workforce. The launch of the site, which features the Work Design for Health approach…

Christina Cross wins prestigious award for paper that parses out racial/ethnic differences when looking at family structure & children’s education

Head shot of Christina Cross

A paper by Harvard Pop Center post-doctoral fellow Christina Cross, PhD, was selected by the National Council on Family Relations (NCFR) as the winner of the 2020 Reuben Hill Award. Cross’s paper, which is being recognized for making a “substantial and significant contribution to family research and theory (with a requirement of theory development),” was selected by a committee that reviewed over 30 leading scholarly journals in the family field.…

Social epidemiologist Lisa Berkman named president-elect of the Population Association of America

Head shot of Professor Lisa Berkman

Lisa Berkman, PhD, director of Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, and the Thomas D. Cabot Professor of Public Policy, Epidemiology, and Global Health and Population at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, has been named president-elect of the Population Association of America (PAA). Berkman will begin her term as president-elect of the non-profit, professional organization dedicated to supporting high-quality population research on January, 1, 2022, followed by one year…

USA Today reports: What does the recent drop in life expectancy in the U.S. tell us?

Head shot of Jennifer Karas Montez

During the pandemic in 2020, life expectancy in the U.S. suffered the biggest drop since World War II, declining by 1.5 years with Black and Hispanic populations seeing even larger drops. According to former post-doc fellow Jennifer Karas Montez who is interviewed by USA Today, the downward trend in U.S. life expectancy and the increasing social and economic inequalities that were taking place before the pandemic hit must be addressed.…

Graduate Student Affiliate In Jeong Hwang wins prestigious award for research paper

Head shot of In Jeong Hwang, graduate student affiliate

In Jeong Hwang, a doctoral student in sociology at Harvard University, has been awarded a first place prize from Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) at the University of Michigan for her Master’s-level paper titled “Grandparenthood, Grandparenting, and Working Longer: Do the Genders of Grandparent and of Grandchild’s Parent Matter?” Congratulations, In Jeong Hwang!

Christina Cross in The Harvard Gazette: “Why living in a two-parent home isn’t a cure-all for Black students”

Illustration of Christina Cross in The Harvard Gazette

Harvard Pop Center Postdoctoral Fellow Christina Cross, PhD, has penned an op-ed in The Harvard Gazette in which she shares her forthcoming research on why a two-parent household is not a panacea for better educational outcomes for low-income Black students. Dr. Cross points to President Biden’s proposed American Families Plan as an example of a policy that could better address inequalities in opportunity than policies anchored to a two-parent household…

Mass vaccination campaign in India may have contributed to spike in cases

Headshot of Professor Subramanian

Professor S (Subu) V Subramanian, PhD, has authored a comment in The Lancet Global Health in which he cautions that the mass vaccination campaign in India may have contributed to the recent increase in COVID-19 cases there. He urges leadership in India to rethink its vaccination strategy to reduce virus spread by preventing overcrowding and enforcing non-pharmaceutical interventions, such as masking and social distancing, at vaccination centers. On IndiaToday.com, Subu…