Yearly Archives: 2014

Boston Adolescents Living in Socially Fragmented Neighborhoods Are Less Physically Active

Photo of Ichiro KawachiAccording to a new study co-authored by affiliated faculty member Ichiro Kawachi, MD, PhD, Boston adolescents who live in neighborhoods that have decreased residential stability were more likely to be physically inactive. This was the only socioeconomic characteristic that was found to be associated with physical inactivity.

Joyce Rosenthal publishes paper on vulnerability to heat-related mortality in New York City

Joyce Klein RosenthalFaculty member Joyce Klein Rosenthal has just published a new paper in Health and Place. “We hope that this neighborhood-level ecological analysis may help to inform the search for adaptive responses and modifiable exposures, as it examines finer-scale patterns of urban vulnerability than previous studies,” says Rosenthal of the study, which is the first analysis of the relationship between neighborhood characteristics and excess mortality in New York City neighborhoods during very hot days.

Largest single donation in Harvard’s history is a game (and name) changer for HSPH

An unfrenkprecedented $350 million dollar gift from the Morningside Foundation, a philanthropic organization established by the family of the late T.H. Chan, will support HSPH as it tackles global health threats such as pandemics, harmful physical and social environments, poverty and humanitarian crises, and failing health systems.  Read about this game- (and name-) changing event in the Harvard Gazette.

Impact of schedule control on quality of care in nursing homes

schedulePop Center director Lisa Berkman and faculty member Cassandra Okechukwu have contributed to a study that examines whether the quality of care in nursing homes can be predicted by schedule control (workers’ ability to decide work hours), independently of other staffing characteristics. The study found that higher schedule control did indeed have the power to improve quality of care, as it was associated a lower prevalence of pressure ulcers.

Erika Sabbath, former Pop Center fellow, receives K01 grant

Photo of Erika SabbathErika Sabbath, who recently joined the faculty of the Graduate School of Social Work at Boston College after completing a post-doctoral fellowship at the Pop Center, has received a major grant from the CDC and its National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. This K01 grant will give her the opportunity to focus intensively on her project “Quantifying Economic & Health Effects of Psychosocial Workplace Exposures.” Congratulations to Erika!

Gillman co-author on Group-Based Intervention Effective in Lowering Gestational Weight Gain Among Obese Women

gillmanHarvard Pop Center faculty member Matthew Gillman, MD, has co-authored a study that reports on the effectiveness of an intervention aimed at lowering the gestational weight gain (GWG) among obese women, as well as reducing the likelihood of large-for-gestational age (LGA) babies.

Ichiro Kawachi is named John L. Loeb and Frances Lehman Loeb Professor of Social Epidemiology

Photo of Ichiro KawachiCongratulations to Ichiro Kawachi, co-director of the RWJF Health & Society Scholars program, who was recently named the John L. Loeb and Frances Lehman Loeb Professor of Social Epidemiology. Dr. Kawachi’s copious publications include the textbook Social Epidemiology, which he co-authored with Lisa Berkman. Dr. Kawachi, Dr. Berkman, and Dr. Maria Glymour will be discussing the just-released second edition of this book next Friday, September 12. Please join us!