Today.com reports: “Women who work for pay have slower memory loss as they age”

A study with former postdoctoral fellow Erika Sabbath, ScD, and Harvard Pop Center Director Lisa Berkman, PhD (on sabbatical 2020-2021) among the authors reports that women who worked for pay during early adulthood and later in life (even if they left the workforce to raise children but later returned) have slower rates of memory decline … Continue reading “Today.com reports: “Women who work for pay have slower memory loss as they age””

Working single mothers may be at slightly higher risk of heart disease, stroke & smoking

Learn more about the findings of a study published in the American Journal of Public Health by Harvard Pop Center Director Lisa Berkman, PhD, Research Associate Iván Mejía-Guevara, PhD, Faculty Member Mauricio Avendano, PhD, former Pop Center Fellow Erika Sabbath, ScD and colleagues, in this Reuters article.

Does work stress combined with family circumstances impact mortality of US mothers?

Many previous studies have separately linked job stress and family circumstances with later-life mortality among working mothers, but a new study published in Social Science & Medicine by Recent Pop Center Fellow Erika Sabbath, Harvard Pop Center Research Associate Iván Mejía-Guevara, former Bell Fellow Clemens Noelke, and Harvard Pop Center Director Lisa Berkman explores how … Continue reading “Does work stress combined with family circumstances impact mortality of US mothers?”

Harvard Pop Center researchers to receive award for article on innovative use of life course work-family profiles to predict mortality risk

The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) has named four researchers affiliated with the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies as the recipients of the Richard Kalish Innovative Publication Awards for their paper published in the American Journal of Public Health on the innovative use of sequence analysis as a exposure assessment tool for life course … Continue reading “Harvard Pop Center researchers to receive award for article on innovative use of life course work-family profiles to predict mortality risk”

Single motherhood before age 50 linked to poorer health later in life

Harvard Pop Center Director Lisa Berkman, PhD, is lead author on a study published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health that found that single motherhood before the age of 50 was associated with poorer health in later life. The association was stronger in England, the US, Denmark, and Sweden than in some of … Continue reading “Single motherhood before age 50 linked to poorer health later in life”

Pop Center researchers publish paper on use of life course work-family profiles to predict mortality risk among US women

Researchers affiliated with the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies have published a study in the American Journal of Public Health that examines the use of sequence analysis as a exposure assessment tool for life course research. Visiting Scientist Erika Sabbath, ScD, who is lead author on the study, collaborated with Research Associate Iván … Continue reading “Pop Center researchers publish paper on use of life course work-family profiles to predict mortality risk among US women”

Erika Sabbath, former Pop Center fellow, receives K01 grant

Erika Sabbath, who recently joined the faculty of the Graduate School of Social Work at Boston College after completing a post-doctoral fellowship at the Pop Center, has received a major grant from the CDC and its National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. This K01 grant will give her the opportunity to focus intensively on … Continue reading “Erika Sabbath, former Pop Center fellow, receives K01 grant”

Maybe not everything gets better with time; a first long-term study of lifetime exposure to solvents and cognitive functioning

As reported in Time and Reuters, Harvard Pop Center fellow Erika Sabbath, ScD, and Harvard Pop Center affiliated faculty member Cassandra A. Okechukwu, ScD, have published a study in Neurology that examines the effects of lifetime solvent exposure among retired French utility workers. Those at greatest risk for cognitive deficits had experienced long-term exposure, even … Continue reading “Maybe not everything gets better with time; a first long-term study of lifetime exposure to solvents and cognitive functioning”