Study of Hurricane Katrina survivors offers unique insights into impact of neighborhood gentrification on health

Researchers affiliated with the Resilience in Survivors of Hurricane Katrina (RISK) project have published a paper that takes a look at the health impacts of being displaced into a gentrified neighborhood. The researchers did not find evidence of significant effects on BMI, self-rated health, or psychological distress. Photo: Ted Eytan on Flickr

Untangling depression and anxiety using hair samples in India

Harvard Pop Center Director Lisa Berkman, PhD, and her colleagues have published a study that has found a connection between higher levels of the sex hormone dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and lower levels of depression when analyzing hair samples of over 2,000 women in rural India. Learn more about how other sex hormones, such as testosterone and … Continue reading “Untangling depression and anxiety using hair samples in India”

A population-level look at subjective well-being after the 2014 Affordable Care Act Medicaid expansion

Researchers affiliated with the Harvard Pop Center, including Director Lisa Berkman, have published a study that looks at the impact of the Medicaid expansion on subjective well-being among low-income and general adult U.S. populations. Self-perceived measures of happiness, sadness, worry, stress, and life satisfaction did not appear to be impacted by the increased access to … Continue reading “A population-level look at subjective well-being after the 2014 Affordable Care Act Medicaid expansion”

Parenting style carries weight when it comes to offspring’s mid-life BMI

A study published in Preventive Medicine has found that an authoritative parenting style (one that blends both warmth and control) is associated with healthier mid-life weight among offspring. Harvard Pop Center Director Lisa Berkman, and faculty members Ichiro Kawachi and Laura Kubzansky, are among the authors*. *Other authors include: lead author Ying Chen and Claudia … Continue reading “Parenting style carries weight when it comes to offspring’s mid-life BMI”

Researchers will shed new light on working longer and delayed retirement with Sloan Foundation grant

In the U.S., as in many industrialized nations, policymakers have embraced the notion that most individuals can (and should) work longer. But changes across generations in health, family, and work may make it hard for substantial sections of the U.S. population to continue to work into their 60s or beyond. With funding from the Alfred … Continue reading “Researchers will shed new light on working longer and delayed retirement with Sloan Foundation grant”

Longer compulsory education not necessarily better for cognitive & mental health outcomes; a natural experiment finds differences between genders

A new study published in the BMJ Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health examined the long-term health impacts of a policy enacted in France that extended compulsory education by two years. Lead author Emilie Courtin, PhD, a current Harvard Bell Fellow, along with Harvard Pop Center Director Lisa Berkman, and faculty members Mauricio Avendano and … Continue reading “Longer compulsory education not necessarily better for cognitive & mental health outcomes; a natural experiment finds differences between genders”

When is more education not necessarily better for health?

Harvard Bell Fellow Emilie Courtin, PhD, is lead author on a study published in Social Science & Medicine that reveals that when mandatory length of education among teenagers in France was raised from age 14 to 16 by a government policy, those students who were from socioeconomically disadvantaged families were later found to have higher blood … Continue reading “When is more education not necessarily better for health?”

New HAALSI study findings: Education negates height disparity in cognitive function for older adults living in South Africa

A study published by HAALSI researchers, including recent Harvard Bell Fellow Lindsay Kobayashi, Pop Center Director Lisa Berkman, and faculty members SV Subramanian (Subu), Kathleen Kahn, and Stephen Tollman, finds that while short stature may be a risk factor for cognitive function among older adults living in South Africa, education was found to negate the relationship between … Continue reading “New HAALSI study findings: Education negates height disparity in cognitive function for older adults living in South Africa”

How can we evaluate how well a country is handling the demograhic shift to becoming an aging society?

A team of researchers, including collaborator and Harvard Pop Center Director Lisa Berkman, PhD, has developed a multidimensional index that measures how well a country is handling the transition to having an increasingly larger proportion of older adults by evaluating status across five domains. The results, published in PNAS, indicate that while the U.S. scored … Continue reading “How can we evaluate how well a country is handling the demograhic shift to becoming an aging society?”