Category Archives: Recently Published

More frequent overnight menopausal hot flashes linked with increased brain scan changes

thurstonRebecca Thurston, PhD, Harvard Robert Wood Johnson Health & Society Scholar program alumna, is lead author on a study published in Menopause that explores a link between brain health (measured by white matter hyperintensities (WMH)) and menopausal hot flashes. The study has received attention in Neurosciencenews.com, Sleep Review, MedicalXpress, University Herald, and HealthNewsDigest.com.

In India, is child’s BMI influenced more by mother’s BMI than father’s?

subramania_headshot-for-panelHarvard Pop Center faculty member S V Subramanian (Subu), PhD, and former Harvard Bell Fellow Daniel Corsi, PhD, are co-authors on a paper published in Archives of Disease in Childhood that explores the fetal roots of body mass index (BMI) in India.

Report warns of high cost of increasing non-communicable diseases in Indonesia

Mark McGovernA World Economic Forum report co-authored by Pop Center affiliated faculty member David Bloom, PhD, and PGDA Fellow Mark McGovern, PhD, warn that increasing non-communicable diseases (cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases, diabetes and mental health conditions) could cost the emerging country of Indonesia close to 4.5 trillion dollars from 2012-2030. The report was covered by CNBC and this Wall Street Journal blog.

Does childhood abuse affect blood pressure as early as adolescence?

Harvard Pop Center Sheridan_McLaughlinRWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumnae Margaret Sheridan, PhD, and Kate McLaughlin, PhD, are co-authors on a study in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology that finds that adolescents who had a history of child abuse had higher diastolic blood pressure (DBP), suggesting a potential pathway by which child abuse leads to hypertension.

Do children from immigrant families in U.S. receive equal quality of pediatric healthcare?

summer_headshotRobert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar program alumna Summer Hawkins, PhD, along with lead author Rocio Calvo Vilches, PhD, a former Harvard Pop Center Bell Fellow, have published a study in Maternal and Child Health Journal that finds that perceived disparities in pediatric healthcare tended to lessen from first to third generation immigrant status, although there was some variation between racial/ethnic groups.

Job stress that impacts family life linked to increased cardiometabolic risk

Berkman_Lisa_croppedA WFHN study of nursing home employees found that job stress that impacts family life (work-to-family conflict) is linked to increased cardiometabolic risk, whereas being married and having younger children at home was protective against this increased risk. Lisa Berkman is lead author on study, published in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, which also found that family conflict that impacted work life (family-to-work conflict) was associated with getting less sleep.

Single motherhood before age 50 linked to poorer health later in life

Berkman_Lisa_croppedHarvard Pop Center Director Lisa Berkman, PhD, is lead author on a study published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health that found that single motherhood before the age of 50 was associated with poorer health in later life. The association was stronger in England, the US, Denmark, and Sweden than in some of the other countries, such as those in Southern Europe, suggesting that social supports (e.g., a strong family network) may play an important role. Co-authors include Harvard Pop Center faculty members Maria Glymour, PhD, and Mauricio Avendano, PhD, and former Pop Center Fellow Erika Sabbath, ScD. The study is receiving international media attention including this article in The Telegraph and this spot on the Today Show on NBC. It is also the subject of this news brief from the Harvard. T.H. Chan School of Public Health.