Collaborating Mentors

 

Jerel Calzo, PhD, MPH

Calzo_Jerel_Headshot

Associate Professor, Division of Health Promotion and Behavioral Science, San Diego State University Graduate School of Public Health, Core Investigator, Institute for Behavioral and Community Health

 

 

Dr. Calzo is a developmental psychologist, Associate Professor in Health Promotion and Behavioral Science at San Diego State University Graduate School of Public Health, and a Core Investigator at the Institute for Behavioral and Community Health. Dr. Calzo’s research focuses broadly on the development of gender and sexual orientation health disparities in adolescence and young adulthood. His work on body image and eating disorders, funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, focuses on body image and eating disorder risk in heterosexual and sexual minority (i.e., gay, bisexual, mostly heterosexual) males. His work breaks new ground is among the first to trace the development of leanness and muscularity concerns, physical activity, and muscle-building drug and dietary supplement use (e.g., creatine, steroids) in both heterosexual and sexual minority males across adolescence. Dr. Calzo’s current work examines how stress and socialization processes in specific contexts (e.g., sports, engagement in sexual minority community contexts) contribute to sexual orientation disparities in eating disorder risk, and how such factors can be targeted in preventive interventions to promote health in all boys and men. He received his PhD from the University of Michigan and MPH from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.


Allegra Gordon, ScD, MPH

Assistant Professor, Department of Community Health Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health 

 

 

Dr. Gordon is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences at Boston University School of Public Health. She received her MPH in Sociomedical Sciences from Columbia University and her doctorate in Social & Behavioral Sciences with a concentration in Women, Gender, and Health from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. In her research Dr. Gordon uses quantitative and qualitative methods to understand the mental and physical health impacts of discrimination and the effects of gender socialization and gender norms on the health of young people across sexual orientations and gender identities. She is funded by the National Institute of Drug Abuse to study how changes in the social and policy environment relate to substance use and health-related quality of life among sexual minorities. Recent projects have included research on weight stigma among sexual minority young adults and a study of gender expression, peer victimization, and eating disorders symptoms among U.S. high school students. In collaboration with The Fenway Institute, she has conducted qualitative research on body image and weight control behaviors among low-income transgender women. She is currently working on an exploratory study on appearance ideals and body image concerns among LGBTQ college students and on a pilot study examining the role of intimate partnerships in relation to body image and sexual health among transgender and non-binary young adults.


Michael Long, ScD, MPH

Michael Long HeadshotAssistant Professor, Department of Prevention and Community Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University 

 

 

Michael Long is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Prevention and Community Health at the Milken Institute School of Public Health at The George Washington University. He conducts research at the intersection of obesity epidemiology and quantitative policy analysis, with the goal of identifying cost-effective and politically feasible policy solutions to the obesity epidemic. He is currently working on the CHOICES (Childhood Obesity Intervention Cost-Effectiveness Study) team led by Steven Gortmaker, evaluating the cost-effectiveness of more than 40 policy and programmatic approaches to prevent childhood obesity in the United States. Previously, Dr. Long mentored Brown University MPH student Esther Li and is now working STRIPED trainee Cindy Hu to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of six unique strategies designed for eating disorders prevention and early detection. Dr. Long earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in politics from Princeton University and a Master of Public Health degree from Yale, where he worked at the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity. He earned his Doctor of Science degree from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Social and Behavioral Sciences, and completed a Postdoctoral Research Fellowship at Harvard focusing on obesity epidemiology and cost-effectiveness analysis.


Nicole E. Negowetti, JD, MA

Lecturer and Clinical Instructor, Animal Law and Policy Clinic, Harvard Law School;  Visiting Instructor, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University

 

Nicole is a food law expert who currently serves as Lecturer on Law and Clinical Instructor at the Harvard Law School Animal Law and Policy Clinic (ALPC) and Visiting Instructor at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.  Prior to joining the ALPC, Nicole was a Clinical Instructor at the Harvard Law School Food Law and Policy Clinic. She was previously the Policy Director of the Good Food Institute, a nonprofit organization that supports plant-based and cultured food technology companies.  Nicole also served as an Associate Professor of Law at the Valparaiso University School of Law from 2011- 2016, where she taught Food Law & Policy and Torts.  Nicole’s teaching and research focuses on the public health, environmental, and socio-economic consequences of policies shaping the U.S. food system. Nicole serves on the Food & Drug Law Journal Editorial Advisory Board and is a founding member of the Academy of Food Law & Policy.


Jennifer Pomeranz, JD, MPH

Jennifer Pomeranz

Assistant Professor, Department of Public Health Policy and Management, College of Global Public Health, New York University

 

 

Jennifer L. Pomeranz is a public health law and policy researcher. Her research interests include marketing, labeling, First Amendment protection,  and youth access issues related to food and beverages, over-the-counter diet drugs, and dietary supplements. She additionally researches and publishes on the topics of preemption of public health, civil rights, and social justice policies, firearm safety, and innovative regulatory strategies to address public health problems, such as diet-related chronic disease. Ms. Pomeranz is an Assistant Professor at the College of Global Public Health at New York University. Previously, she was the Director of Legal Initiatives at the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity at Yale University.  She is currently the Policy Chair of the Health Law Section of the American Public Health Association. She earned her Juris Doctorate from Cornell Law School, and her Master of Public Health from the Harvard School of Public Health.


Katherine Record, JD, MPH, MA

Katherine Record (1)

Executive Director, Lahey MassHealth Accountable Care Organization, Lahey Clinical Performance Network

 

 

Katherine is the Executive Director of the Lahey MassHealth Accountable Care Organization (ACO), a risk contract designed to improve the efficiency and quality of care delivered to Medicaid patients within the state. In this capacity, she oversees care management and quality improvement initiatives aiming to reduce total cost of care and improve the ability of primary care providers to manage patient care. With STRIPED, Katherine has examined the ways that federal regulation could prohibit the fashion industry from employing severely underweight runway models, which would both protect the health of these individuals as well as disconnect skeletal frames from the epitome of female beauty and worth. Prior to joining Lahey, Katherine was the deputy director of Behavioral Health Integration & Accountable Care at the Health Policy Commission. She has also worked at the Harvard Law School’s Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation and the O’Neill Institute for National & Global Health Law at Georgetown University on issues related to the expansion and standardization of mental health courts, healthcare reform implementation, public health law reform, firearms control, and global preparation for pre-exposure prophylaxis to prevent the transmission of HIV (PrEP). Katherine received her JD, cum laude, and masters in Psychology at Duke University, her MPH from Harvard’s School of Public Health, and her BA, magna cum laude, from Georgetown University. She is licensed to practice law in the State of New York.


Rachel F. Rodgers, PhD, FAED

Associate Professor, Department of Applied Psychology, APPEAR, Northeastern University, Boston, USA Department of Psychiatric Emergency & Acute Care, Lapeyronie Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Regional Universitaire, Montpellier, France

 

 

Rachel Rodgers, PhD, FAED, is an associate professor of Applied Psychology at Northeastern University, and Director of the Applied Psychology Program for Appearance and Eating Research (APPEAR). Dr. Rodgers received her PhD from the University of Toulouse in France. Her research with APPEAR focuses on body image, disordered eating and other appearance-changing behaviors. Grounded in sociocultural models, this work aims to develop models of the effects of socio-cultural determinants on these behaviors, with a view to prevention of eating disorders and associated concerns at the individual level and also through public policy. She is a collaborating mentor with the STRIPED program, and a member of the Advisory Board of Model Alliance. In addition, she is a Fellow of the Academy of Eating Disorders.


Mihail Samnaliev, PhD

Mihail SamnalievAssistant Professor in Pediatrics, Department of General Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School and Health Economist, Clinical Research Center, Boston Children’s Hospital

 

 

Mihail Samnaliev, PhD, is a senior health economist in the Clinical Research Center, Boston Children’s Hospital, and Assistant Professor at the Department of General Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School. He is interested in applied economic evaluations that can be used to improve the economic efficiency of the healthcare system. Over the past decade he has been a co-investigator on numerous research grants involving cost, cost-effectiveness, and cost-benefit analysis of health programs and interventions. Dr. Samnaliev regularly consults researchers on matters related to collection and analysis of cost data, cost-effectiveness, and cost-benefit analysis, and research design of observational studies. He previously has mentored STRIPED trainee LeAnn Noh on an economic pilot study to estimate the cost of eating disorders to our nation’s healthcare system and society.


Kendrin Sonneville, ScD, RD, LDN

Kendrin Sonneville update 2015

Assistant Professor, Nutritional Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health 

 

 

Kendrin Sonneville is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Nutritional Sciences at the University of Michigan School of Public Health and is a Collaborating Mentor for the Strategic Training Initiative for the Prevention of Eating Disorders (STRIPED) at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Boston Children’s Hospital. Dr. Sonneville is a registered dietitian, behavioral scientist, and public health researcher whose research is focused on the prevention of eating disorders. The goal of her research program is to understand how to “help without harming,” specifically, how to best promote health and nutrition among youth without inadvertently increasing body dissatisfaction, weight stigma, preoccupation with food and weight, and disordered eating. Dr. Sonneville received a Bachelor of Science in Nutritional Sciences and a Bachelor of Science in Dietetics from Michigan State University, a Master of Science in Human Nutrition from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University, and Doctor of Science in Public Health Nutrition from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Dr. Sonneville is the former Director of Nutrition Training in the Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Health at Boston Children’s Hospital and was the co-director of STRIPED for several years, providing mentorship to numerous trainees and spearheading STRIPED’s new line of research and training in cost-effectiveness analysis of eating disorders preventive interventions.

 


Alvin Tran, ScD, MPH

Assistant Professor, Department of Health Administration and Policy, University of New Haven

 

 

Alvin Tran, ScD, MPH, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Administration and Policy at the University of New Haven. His research focuses on the intersection of body image, disordered eating behaviors, health policy, and racial and sexual minority health. At the University of New Haven, Dr. Tran leads the WeEmbody (or WE) Lab, which is a research working group of public health professionals and students. Dr. Tran is a member of the Academy for Eating Disorders and currently serves as a co-chair for the organization’s Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion committee. He is an advocate for the prevention of eating disorders and was the 2018 recipient of the SPARK Impact Award for Activism and Issue Advocacy by the City of Boston.


Davene Wright, PhD

 Assistant Professor,  Department of Pediatrics and Program in Health Economic and Outcomes Methodology, University of Washington and Seattle Children’s Research Institute

 

 

Dr. Wright is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at University of Washington and an Investigator in the Center for Child Health, Behavior, and Development at the Seattle Children’s Research Institute. She completed her PhD in Health Policy and Decision Sciences at Harvard University. Previously, Dr. Wright worked with STRIPED trainees Yushan Jiang and Hyungi LeAnn Noh to carry out what may have been the first-ever U.S. cost-effectiveness study of eating disorders screening. Now, Dr. Wright is collaborating on a new cost-effectiveness analysis study of six unique strategies designed for eating disorders prevention and early detection. Dr. Wright is interested in how stakeholders (be they patients, providers, or healthcare payers) make decisions about the use and allocation of healthcare resources and how they can make better decisions in the presence of uncertainty, complexity, and competing values. This field draws upon health economics, psychology, and epidemiology, among other disciplines. Her research focuses on the supply and demand of effective and efficient healthcare for children with obesity.